Jump to content


AR15Armory Announcements


Photo

Post military law enforcement opportunities


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   VictoryForge

VictoryForge

  • Group:Members*
  • Member ID: 31,705
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: Dec. 28 2016
  • Location:Fort Hood, Tx


Posted Jan. 01 2017 - 02:10 PM

Hey all,

 

Wanted to share with y'all my hope to get into law enforcement after my contract is up in May of 2019 with the US Military. More specific, I'm hoping to get into Texas State Troopers. With that being said, would anyone here with law enforcement experience like to share their personal experience, likes, dislikes, stories and advice for someone looking to get into it? 

 

Thanks so much. 

 

Chase 

 

0005458.jpeg




Signature:

1933703_1674184742852854_381601992549976


#2 OFFLINE   Pepper

Pepper

    Ban-O-Matic


  • Group:Admins
  • Member ID: 21
  • Posts: 36,828
  • Joined: Sep. 17 2005
  • Location:Oregon


Posted Jan. 01 2017 - 03:59 PM

It is still a noble profession. A year ago, I would have told you to be a fireman instead. Now, I see hope for the profession with a more conservative president and administration in charge. 

 

Basic bits of advice. Eat right, live right. Stay healthy, because this job can ruin you. If you smoke or dip, stop. Being military, it won't be a challenge to stay in shape, you know what to do. Keep your emotional/mental house in order too. Remember that it's just a job too. Yeah, it's a calling, yeah, I think it's something that we're either cut out to do or not, but if it starts peeling you apart, there are other gigs. Interview the departments you want to work for as much as they interview you. Learn the pros and cons of each agency, what looks cool from the outside might be a pain in the ass to work for. Know going in that your career is in greater danger from threats inside the walls of your HQ than it ever will be from dangers on the street. Know that in most cases, incompetent people that can't be fired are made into administrators. Nepotism is alive and well, and exists in almost every agency. Don't bother to do this job unless you're union. I can't fathom how some guys are paid so little, and serve at the whim of the particular administration in charge. If you absolutely must work in a non-union shop, join your local FOP lodge. Their politics suck, but they work hard for cops, and will send lawyers to represent you if things go sideways. Many departments are rife with infidelity and alcohol abuse, because those cops don't handle their mental/emotional needs, and use destructive behaviors because of the stresses of the job. Know this going in, and know that it's probably not a positive environment for your wife/family. I keep mine at a slight distance, because of just that. I don't want to go to a "family" get together, and have Joe from midnight shift drunkenly trying to fight other guys from his shift, or hear about how so and so is doing a dispatcher, but don't let his wife find out. If you're religious, talk to the chaplain. If you're not, get a shrink. If it gets more than the chaplain can handle, get a shrink. Use peer support. DON'T tell your spouse everything. While they may think they want to know, they really don't. Telling them in broad terms what happened is great and fine, but describing everything to them can suck them into your world, and they're not prepared for that. I made the mistake of telling my wife about a little kid that was badly abused by their parents. It shook me up really bad, so I told her everything. Details about the abuse, the callousness of the parent, up until we told them we were taking their kid away. She didn't handle it that well. If yours is in a similar profession (nurse, ER doc, paramedic, EMT, firefighter, other cop) then you can share, she has a frame of reference, she knows some of the shat you'll see and hear and smell and taste, and that won't disappear after your after shift shower. It's why so many cops wind up marrying people from those other professions. They "get it", and you can be their support person too, because of the shat they see.

 

I hope some of this helps. Remember, it's a 25-30 year career. It's a marathon, not a sprint. Take care of yourself, get into a sustainable rhythm, in an agency that will support you for the long haul. Take care of the things you'll need to keep running. If not, you'll fall down on the track, and every time you do, it's harder to get back up and start running again. 


  • VictoryForge likes this


Signature:

"Weakness of attitude becomes weakness of character"
- Einstein


Isaiah 6:8
Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, "Who shall I send? And who will go for us?" And I said, "Here I am. Send me!"

 

I will NOT comply!
 

 


#3 OFFLINE   VictoryForge

VictoryForge

  • Group:Members*
  • Member ID: 31,705
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: Dec. 28 2016
  • Location:Fort Hood, Tx


Posted Jan. 01 2017 - 10:42 PM

It is still a noble profession. A year ago, I would have told you to be a fireman instead. Now, I see hope for the profession with a more conservative president and administration in charge. 

 

Basic bits of advice. Eat right, live right. Stay healthy, because this job can ruin you. If you smoke or dip, stop. Being military, it won't be a challenge to stay in shape, you know what to do. Keep your emotional/mental house in order too. Remember that it's just a job too. Yeah, it's a calling, yeah, I think it's something that we're either cut out to do or not, but if it starts peeling you apart, there are other gigs. Interview the departments you want to work for as much as they interview you. Learn the pros and cons of each agency, what looks cool from the outside might be a pain in the ass to work for. Know going in that your career is in greater danger from threats inside the walls of your HQ than it ever will be from dangers on the street. Know that in most cases, incompetent people that can't be fired are made into administrators. Nepotism is alive and well, and exists in almost every agency. Don't bother to do this job unless you're union. I can't fathom how some guys are paid so little, and serve at the whim of the particular administration in charge. If you absolutely must work in a non-union shop, join your local FOP lodge. Their politics suck, but they work hard for cops, and will send lawyers to represent you if things go sideways. Many departments are rife with infidelity and alcohol abuse, because those cops don't handle their mental/emotional needs, and use destructive behaviors because of the stresses of the job. Know this going in, and know that it's probably not a positive environment for your wife/family. I keep mine at a slight distance, because of just that. I don't want to go to a "family" get together, and have Joe from midnight shift drunkenly trying to fight other guys from his shift, or hear about how so and so is doing a dispatcher, but don't let his wife find out. If you're religious, talk to the chaplain. If you're not, get a shrink. If it gets more than the chaplain can handle, get a shrink. Use peer support. DON'T tell your spouse everything. While they may think they want to know, they really don't. Telling them in broad terms what happened is great and fine, but describing everything to them can suck them into your world, and they're not prepared for that. I made the mistake of telling my wife about a little kid that was badly abused by their parents. It shook me up really bad, so I told her everything. Details about the abuse, the callousness of the parent, up until we told them we were taking their kid away. She didn't handle it that well. If yours is in a similar profession (nurse, ER doc, paramedic, EMT, firefighter, other cop) then you can share, she has a frame of reference, she knows some of the shat you'll see and hear and smell and taste, and that won't disappear after your after shift shower. It's why so many cops wind up marrying people from those other professions. They "get it", and you can be their support person too, because of the shat they see.

 

I hope some of this helps. Remember, it's a 25-30 year career. It's a marathon, not a sprint. Take care of yourself, get into a sustainable rhythm, in an agency that will support you for the long haul. Take care of the things you'll need to keep running. If not, you'll fall down on the track, and every time you do, it's harder to get back up and start running again. 

 

Ban-O-Matic,

 

First off, awesome name! 

 

But on serious terms, I do want to thoroughly thank you for your honest advice and experience on law enforcement. I did not realize how insanely tolling the job can be. However, you were absolutely right when you said that it's more of a calling than just a job. I'd have to agree completely. I personally think that getting into law enforcement will be a great transition for me coming out of my military contract, and for the fact that I do not really enjoy office work, I think that at the very least being outside for the majority of the time will really help me be more optimistic about my work. Another thing you mentioned is smoking/dipping, luckily I have never been into either. Don't get me wrong I enjoy my weekend beers, but other than that there is nothing else. It really does sadden me to hear that going to family get together's sounds like such a bad experience, but I with heed your warning and make sure that I don't get into the same issues that you encountered. It's a blessing that my wife is a pediatric nurse in the emergency room because I do believe that she would be able to handle at least the majority of the situations that I encounter. I feel like some of those things that you see you should get off your chest, in order to maintain a healthy mental state and mind. 

 

That story you mentioned is crazy, I couldn't imagine seeing and experiencing something like that, but boy I bet it felt good to be the solution and the reason that child got to a better home! It's a shame how some people act these days. Some stuff is unbelievable. I really do believe that law enforcement are workers of God himself. 

 

Again, thanks so much for the advice, knowledge, and honesty about law enforcement, and thank you for sharing your experience. 

 

Respectfully,

 

Chase




#4 OFFLINE   jchtrh

jchtrh

    "Tribesman"


  • Group:Senior Staff
  • Member ID: 5,622
  • Posts: 13,598
  • Joined: Mar. 27 2008
  • Location:Anchorage, Alaska


Contributor

Posted Jan. 02 2017 - 01:32 AM

Great summation Pepper, I agree on all accounts.

I would recommend a few things:

Document everything
Never treat any call as "routine"
Be assertive, not aggressive
Always have a plan b,c,d and e
Play the "what if" game, it helps you mentally and may save you the milliseconds that give you the edge.
Remember that reaction never beats action
Be polite until the moment or situation dictates otherwise, then regain composure.
Never become apathetic
Always wear your vest
Carry spare magazines
Never leave home angry, kiss and hug your family as much as you can.
Keep work problems at wok and home problems at home.
Always do things with integrity to reinforce your character
Don't expect gratitude, but appreciative when you do receive it.
You will have stress, find healthy ways to reduce the stress

Those are just a few things off the top of my head, you sound as if this would give you purpose and that is what you will need to remember 20 years from now when you start questioning your decision to do the job.

Stay safe!
  • VictoryForge likes this


Signature:
“If you are going through hell, keep going.”
Winston Churchill


"The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy"
Martin Luther King Jr.

"Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."
George Carlin

My State is BIGGER than yours!

"Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety."
Benjamin Franklin

#5 OFFLINE   VictoryForge

VictoryForge

  • Group:Members*
  • Member ID: 31,705
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: Dec. 28 2016
  • Location:Fort Hood, Tx


Posted Jan. 02 2017 - 02:06 AM

Great summation Pepper, I agree on all accounts.

I would recommend a few things:

Document everything
Never treat any call as "routine"
Be assertive, not aggressive
Always have a plan b,c,d and e
Play the "what if" game, it helps you mentally and may save you the milliseconds that give you the edge.
Remember that reaction never beats action
Be polite until the moment or situation dictates otherwise, then regain composure.
Never become apathetic
Always wear your vest
Carry spare magazines
Never leave home angry, kiss and hug your family as much as you can.
Keep work problems at wok and home problems at home.
Always do things with integrity to reinforce your character
Don't expect gratitude, but appreciative when you do receive it.
You will have stress, find healthy ways to reduce the stress

Those are just a few things off the top of my head, you sound as if this would give you purpose and that is what you will need to remember 20 years from now when you start questioning your decision to do the job.

Stay safe!

 

Awesome tips jchtrh, I appreciate it. Believe it or not I will remember this when I get on the job in a couple years! That's why I'm getting my advice now! 




#6 ONLINE   Retcop

Retcop

    No Country for Old Men


  • Group:Silver Patron
  • Member ID: 19,861
  • Posts: 28,143
  • Joined: May. 28 2010
  • Location:SOUTHERN Illinois


Posted Jan. 04 2017 - 07:23 AM

Let me ask you this, VF:

 

As a Peace Officer, what is the most important part of your job ?

 

John

 

(no coaching now)   :)


Edited by Retcop, Jan. 04 2017 - 07:25 AM.



Signature:

A Vote for Trump is a vote for a liberal !

 

NRA Life Member

The People's power flows through the States, not Washington.

Repeal the 17th Amendment.

Read Levin's The Liberty Amendments, Liberty and Tyranny, Ameratopia, and Men in Black.


#7 OFFLINE   RetDet

RetDet

    Just Waiting


  • Group:Silver Patron
  • Member ID: 141
  • Posts: 11,794
  • Joined: Sep. 25 2005
  • Location:Ohio


Posted Jan. 07 2017 - 11:52 AM

Victory Forge as usual Pepper covered it very well. I have been retired for a few years now.Never regret my time. I was very careful to keep my wife away from my work. I feel LE is a calling and not a job. Its hard on any family life working weekends and holidays.

 

Pepper was right the worst threats come from your own office




Signature:

J.R. Aka RetDet

 

LOYALTY ABOVE ALL ELSE

 

Old School All The Way

If You Don"t Stand Behind Our Troops, Please Feel Free To Stand In Front Of Them

If you want peace, prepare for war.

 


#8 OFFLINE   gshayd

gshayd

    Crazy as a craphouse rat


  • Group:Gold Patron
  • Member ID: 24,285
  • Posts: 25,149
  • Joined: Oct. 10 2011
  • Location:The ugliest house on the block


Posted Jan. 08 2017 - 05:32 AM

Here in Texas the law enforcment agencies are looking for Veterans

 

Hey all,

 

Wanted to share with y'all my hope to get into law enforcement after my contract is up in May of 2019 with the US Military. More specific, I'm hoping to get into Texas State Troopers. With that being said, would anyone here with law enforcement experience like to share their personal experience, likes, dislikes, stories and advice for someone looking to get into it? 

 

Thanks so much. 

 

Chase 

 

0005458.jpeg

http://www.dps.texas...cruiterMap.htm#

 

http://www.dps.texas.../preQualify.htm


Edited by gshayd, Jan. 08 2017 - 05:34 AM.



Signature:

NRA 4 Life
M1Garand.jpg

 

 3b3e8bab-4ecf-46a2-a495-0d6d30813a76.jpg
 

As it will be in the future it was at the birth of Man

There are only four things certain since Social Progress began

That the Dog returns to his Vomit and the Sow returns to her Mire.

And the burnt Fool's Bandaged finger goes wabbling back to the fire

 

"It is amazing that people who think we cannot afford to pay for doctors, hospitals, and medication somehow think that we can afford to pay for doctors, hospitals, medication and a government bureaucracy to administer “universal health care.”  Dr Thomas Sowell


#9 OFFLINE   GLShooter

GLShooter

  • Group:Armory Staff
  • Member ID: 7,056
  • Posts: 20,281
  • Joined: Aug. 29 2008
  • Location:Arizona


Posted Jan. 09 2017 - 02:46 PM

Let me ask you this, VF:
 
As a Peace Officer, what is the most important part of your job ?
 
John
 
(no coaching now)   :)


That's a tough one. I'm not VF but I know this one.

Greg


Signature:
The best gun for self defense? Any loaded one will do.

#10 OFFLINE   towtruck

towtruck

  • Group:G.D. Staff
  • Member ID: 22,192
  • Posts: 14,442
  • Joined: Jan. 31 2011
  • Location:California


Posted Jan. 09 2017 - 03:17 PM

That's a tough one. I'm not VF but I know this one.

Greg

I think I have that answer too. I know at least for me it would be.




Signature:
Posted Image
 
 
In the words of my grandfather...
"Beauty is only skin deep- ugly goes clear to the bone!"
"You can't fix stupid"
"Sometimes fishing is better than catching"
"There is no sense being stupid unless you show it"
"Guns and fishing poles----you can never have enough!"
"When it comes to your wife and buying more guns it is better to beg for forgiveness than to ask for permission!"
"If you fly it, float it, or ***k it, RENT it!"
 
 

#11 OFFLINE   Etho

Etho

    The Donut Man


  • Group:Members
  • Member ID: 84
  • Posts: 25,661
  • Joined: Sep. 21 2005
  • Location:Donut Shop Alpha


Posted Jan. 09 2017 - 06:28 PM

Make sure it's something you really want to do before wading off is the biggest piece of advice I can give. It's not a hard job by any means, as long as you have common sense. It's a very fun job if you choose to make it fun. It can be unbearably miserable if you choose to make it miserable. But it is 100% thankless and every one but you will know the right answer. That last bit never bothered me, I just keep on having fun and don't worry about what the armchair experts have to say.

 

Also understand that it WILL NOT be what you think it is. It's mostly boring and repetitive truth be told. Lots of the same thing over and over again. Depending on where you work it can be boringly slow or mind blowingly fast paced. We wash a lot of people out of training because of the fast paced atmosphere. We don't have time to dick around on a call and they simply cannot keep up and learn fast enough. Granted most of the calls are simple or, to be honest, dumb stuff. But it's still a lot to take in and in a short amount of time to boot. 

 

Personally, I enjoy my job. Nothing is really expected of me from a productivity stand point other than to answer my calls. As long as I do that, do the right thing on the call and follow policy/the law there is no problem. If I don't feel that great and want to sit in a parking lot, I can sit in a parking lot. If I feel like working that night, I can go work. Generally speaking I stay pretty busy either answering calls, helping out adjacent districts with their calls or going out looking for bad people doing bad things. But there are times where I just go sit and cool my heels. Overall I have fun with it and enjoy what I do even though I'm still humping calls in a beat. I'm an FTO, instructor at the academy, firearms instructor for the academy and department, have had opportunities to do super secret squirrel stuff temporarily. Even if I do nothing else in my career I've had a pretty good one. But by no means am I done trying to excel and take advantage of opportunities. 

 

If you're an extrovert who likes people and to talk, it's a pretty fitting career. As long as you can stomach the despair, insanity and violence. Probably the most fun I have is going to visit with folks in my beat when the calls are down. It may be one of the prostitutes, the shot up paralyzed former dope dealer or grandpa and grandma with no grand kids who just like to talk about the old days and every one in between. 

 

Lastly, why in the hell do you want to be a IMM(Interstate Meter Maid)? You do realize that they don't actually do any police work right? They write tickets, work wrecks outside of city limits and do DWIs. A scant few of them get the dope hound disease and work the highways for dope loads, but when I say scant few, I mean a scant few. The only upside to DPS is their pay scale nowadays. But even that taken into account, no way in hell would I go work for them. Micro-managed is an understatement and if you love getting written up and days off for stupid shat then that's the place for you. 


Edited by Etho, Jan. 09 2017 - 06:32 PM.



Signature:
"Is that the come back and kick me whistle?" Roger Smith

#12 ONLINE   Retcop

Retcop

    No Country for Old Men


  • Group:Silver Patron
  • Member ID: 19,861
  • Posts: 28,143
  • Joined: May. 28 2010
  • Location:SOUTHERN Illinois


Posted Jan. 09 2017 - 06:42 PM

It is one of the easiest jobs in the world to be a police.

 

It is one of the hardest jobs in the world to be a good cop.

 

 

John




#13 ONLINE   Retcop

Retcop

    No Country for Old Men


  • Group:Silver Patron
  • Member ID: 19,861
  • Posts: 28,143
  • Joined: May. 28 2010
  • Location:SOUTHERN Illinois


Posted Jan. 10 2017 - 12:44 AM

Come on, VF, it's not a trick question.

 

I was an FTO, and I asked every officer I trained the exact same question.

 

You are amongst friends here.

 

John




#14 ONLINE   Jaeger48

Jaeger48

    chances are I'm wrong


  • Group:Silver Patron
  • Member ID: 21,618
  • Posts: 9,381
  • Joined: Nov. 29 2010
  • Location:Lynnwood, WA


Posted Jan. 10 2017 - 02:20 AM

That's a tough one. I'm not VF but I know this one.

Greg


I think I have an answer as well but chances are I'm wrong.





Forum Statistics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Information Center