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How Indian Are You?


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#1 OFFLINE   scotto

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Posted Sep. 16 2008 - 09:13 AM

How Indian Are You?


Of the 12 races listed on the latest census form, only one has an official membership card. That document, known as "the white card," is what makes an Indian an Indian—at least in the eyes of many U.S. government and tribal programs.

Not surprisingly, the use of the white card to record a human pedigree raises civil rights concerns. The use of "blood quantum" to define a genetic cut-off point for Indian people is viewed by many as an instrument of assimilation or extermination. Yet over a century, blood quantum has become a deeply ingrained—and even valued—tool in the relations between sovereign tribes and the rest of world.

As a new generation of Indians comes of age, blood quantum reform may be closely tied to the future of Indian nations and cultures.


COREY LAWRENCE IS A HALF-BLOOD SPEAR LAKE SIOUX. Lawrence, a junior at St. Cloud State University, is an enrolled member of the North Dakota tribe along with his father. But his mother is Ojibwe, and right now that means Corey Lawrence's grandchildren will probably no longer make the cut at Spear Lake.

"It's an iffy thing. I'm enrolled, but after my kids have kids that's it. They can't be enrolled any more and the funding stops. And that's what I think blood quantum was set up to do. In a way, it could be seen as genocide," says Lawrence.

The vast majority of Indian tribes require one-quarter blood, specifically from their reservation, for enrollment. One full-blooded grandparent, for example, would give someone a blood-quantum of one-quarter.

Today, blood quantum data is dispersed among the records of 558 federally-recognized tribes. But conventional wisdom holds that most enrolled Indians, especially in the younger generation, have a blood quantum of less than one-half. This is of some concern to groups like the Minnesota Chippewa.

"It's against our spiritual beliefs to marry someone within your clan," says Tom Andrus, who teaches Ojibwe history at St. Cloud State University. He notes the irony that Minnesota's Ojibwe clans can maintain their bloodline only by betraying their culture.

"Let's say I'm a quarter-blood from Fond du Lac, and I marry a quarter-blood from Mille Lacs. Our children are no longer considered Indian by the federal government, because they're not 25 percent from one nation," says Andrus.

And when you're not Indian enough, many tangible benefits stop. Generations within families can be divided by tribal enrollment. And Indian communities are torn between losing members through intermarriage, and the real or perceived role of blood quantum in keeping the remaining cultures pure and strong.

For this last reason, Andrus wouldn't do away with blood quantum. But he foresees more talk of reform as today's quarter-blood young people reach child-bearing age.

"I think that blood quantum is going to affect the basis of who we are, and it's going to affect it in a major way, in the next 15 to 20 years," says Andrus.

And when you're not Indian enough, many tangible benefits stop. Generations within families can be divided by tribal enrollment. And Indian communities are torn between losing members through intermarriage, and the real or perceived role of blood quantum in keeping the remaining cultures pure and strong.

For this last reason, Andrus wouldn't do away with blood quantum. But he foresees more talk of reform as today's quarter-blood young people reach child-bearing age.

"I think that blood quantum is going to affect the basis of who we are, and it's going to affect it in a major way, in the next 15 to 20 years," says Andrus.

Blood quantum in the U.S. has been around longer than the country itself. In perhaps the earliest example, a 1705 Virginia colony law defines 'mulatto' to be anyone who was at least one-half Indian or one-eighth black. In Minnesota, the first appearance of the blood quantum may be the Treaty of 1837, in which one clause makes provisions for the "half-breed relations" of the Ojibwe.

The government came to adopt one-quarter blood quantum to distribute the resources tribes secured in treaties across the country. On one level, it was a bureaucratic necessity: Congress had to draw the line somewhere. The more cynical view assumes that the government had an outcome in mind.

"I don't think anybody then would have dreamed that we'd have lasted this long," says Andrus.

Indians are still around, and the blood quantum establishes the basis in most cases for tribal enrollment. With recent expansion of tribal sovereignty and innovation by reservation governments, being enrolled arguably matters as much as it ever has.

The Indian Child Welfare Act protects the cultural rights of enrolled children. Many Minnesota tribes will supplement state financial aid to meet the cost of a college education for tribal members. Tribal health services offer free or very affordable care for enrolled members. Some reservations, like Mille Lacs, can essentially guarantee members a job. And in rare cases, such as the Mystic Lake Casino owned and operated by the Mdewakaton Sioux, cash payments from tribal enterprises can make tribal members millionaires.

A tribe's right to discriminate based on blood comes from its status as a sovereign nation. But blood quantum distinctions can divide families in a way that's unique.

Kathy Lawrence, a nursing student at SCSU, is more than one-quarter Ojibwe, but does not have enough Indian blood from either Red Lake or White Earth for tribal membership. Her half-brother does, but she worries there would be trouble if she joined him on family hunting trips.

"Up in Red Lake my brother hunts. They hunt and fish and snare rabbits, and do it as a family thing, learning about the land. I can't do that. That part's kind of hard because it's a family thing. I think that's the part I miss the most," says Lawrence.

No tribe or government service is obligated to use blood quantum. The White Earth Indian health center, administered by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, avoids tough choices by giving free health care to anyone who can show any relation to a recognized tribe.

"We want to take care of the whole family and extended family," says director Jon McArthur. "It could be really disruptive if certain members of the family were enrolled, and some were not enrolled. You could potentially provide services to maybe the parents and not the children. We want to provide services to all our people here," says McArthur.

The White Earth clinic can afford this practice for now. But tribes - and many sympathetic non-enrolled Indians - worry that liberalizing enrollment on a large scale could put a major financial strain on Indian programs faced with increasing demand.

Some fear a cultural strain as well, if the blood quantum-based definition of "Indian" were to change. The new census figures will do little to allay such concerns. For the first time, the census allowed Americans to choose more than one race, and the number of people checking "Indian" doubled compared with 1990. It grew by 62 percent in Minnesota, to more than 81,000. But tribal records show actual enrollment may be closer to half that number.

The interim director of the American Indian Center at St. Cloud State, a descendent of the Choctaw nation, has light hair and blue eyes, and lacks the blood quantum for enrollment. But Rex Veeder understands the desire to protect the purity of tribal populations.

"Let's face it. Indian folks, rightfully so, are very nervous about people coming into their community, saying they're Indian, and kind of taking over stuff and appropriating the culture," says Veeder. "Personally, I like that. I kind of like the idea that people in certain communties keep that circle to themselves, and preserve their sovereignty and integrity as a people."

In coming years Minnesota tribes may look more closely to the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, which extends membership to anyone who can trace an ancestor to a 120-year-old membership list. The Cherokee add 1000 members each month, and are now arguably the largest tribe in the nation. They are also, perhaps, the most diluted.

The U.S. government decided more than 100 years ago that blood quantum was what made an Indian. But to many of today's younger native people, at least, it makes sense to look more than skin-deep -- at cultural values, religious practice, and whether they intend to contribute to the reservation community. Jenny Wharton, a 19-year-old freshman in St. Cloud, is Choctaw and Comanche.

"I personally don't know what my quantum is. I know it's about four generations back. But at the same time, I could be one one-hundredth, the smallest percent, and I'd still consider myself an Indian, because it's inside of me," says Wharton.

Perhaps it should come as no surprise that Minnesota's tribal elders are already one step ahead. In a move designed to address the issue of dwindling blood lines, the Minnesota Indian Council of Elders is asking state tribes to recognize one another's blood quantum as equally valid. As tribes ponder the proposal, another generation is coming of age.

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#2 ONLINE   TomJefferson

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Posted Sep. 16 2008 - 09:30 AM

I'm zero.

The wife is 1/4 based on tracing back to the "Baker's List" the Cherokee thing mentioned in the article but the article also has it very wrong too. The list does have a cut off of 1/16th and that's from that list.

Though we haven't done anything about it at all, technically unless my son marries a Cherokee, he would be the last one in my family to be considered of Cherokee decent.

The article is very misleading. The entire 120 year old list was to limit not make more people eligible.

Tj


#3 OFFLINE   jem375

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Posted Sep. 16 2008 - 10:54 AM

I'm supposedly 1/4 Oklahoma Cherokee, parents were from Oklahoma, lived in Texas 22 years before moving to Minnesota.


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#4 OFFLINE   scotto

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Posted Sep. 16 2008 - 04:12 PM

I'm zero.

The wife is 1/4 based on tracing back to the "Baker's List" the Cherokee thing mentioned in the article but the article also has it very wrong too. The list does have a cut off of 1/16th and that's from that list.

Though we haven't done anything about it at all, technically unless my son marries a Cherokee, he would be the last one in my family to be considered of Cherokee decent.

The article is very misleading. The entire 120 year old list was to limit not make more people eligible.

Tj


Don’t you mean the “Dawes Roll” or “Dawes List?”

“In coming years Minnesota tribes may look more closely to the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, which extends membership to anyone who can trace an ancestor to a 120-year-old membership list. The Cherokee add 1000 members each month, and are now arguably the largest tribe in the nation. They are also, perhaps, the most diluted.”


In order to register with the Cherokee Nation you must be issued a Certificate of Degree of Indian Blood (CDIB) by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The white card (as the CDIB is often called) certifies your degree of Indian blood (blood quantum) and the tribe you are affiliated with. To obtain a white card, you must provide legal documents that prove your lineage from an ancestor who is listed, with a roll number and a blood degree, on the Final Rolls of Citizens and Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes, Cherokee Nation. This roll is commonly known as the Dawes Roll. Congressman Henry Dawes was a big advocate of property ownership and he asserted that it was a necessary component of civilized life. The rest of Congress agreed, and in 1887 they enacted into law the Dawes Act. The Act stated that the United States government would provide for the allotment of lands in Indian Reservations. The Cherokee Nation was divided into thousands of small pieces of land, which would be distributed among the Cherokee people. On the surface the act was an attempt to assimilate the Native people into white society, in itself a less than admirable cause, but in reality the Dawes Act did far more than Anglicize the Native Americans. The Act allowed for widespread fraud by government officials and legally stripped Native Americans of much of their land by allowing land not allotted to be opened to settlers. The Dawes Roll was the official roll of the Dawes Act and was open from 1899-1906. In order to receive a parcel of land Cherokees had to sign the rolls. In order to sign the rolls a Cherokee had to have a permanent residence in the Cherokee Nation and have appeared on previous rolls. Those who signed the Dawes Roll provided their names and blood quantum and in return were granted a piece of land in the location they desired. In addition to the "Cherokee by Blood" portion of the Dawes Rolls, there were separate rolls for Cherokee Freedman and Intermarried whites living in the Cherokee Nation.

I think it was only in the last few years that Cherokee Nation council approved a constitutional amendment to require Indian blood for citizenship.

My tribe the White Earth band of Ojibwe wants to lower the Indian blood for citizenship from the 1/4th quantum imposed on us in 1968 by the BIA and the Minnesota Chippewa tribe. The Minnesota Chippewa tribe is an umbrella origination created by the BIA to oversee all Ojibwe nations in Minnesota with the exception of the Red Lake Band which control’s 100% of the land with in its reservation boundary’s and is entity on its own.

Edited by scotto, Sep. 16 2008 - 04:15 PM.



#5 OFFLINE   hsracer201

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Posted Sep. 16 2008 - 05:18 PM

my great grandmother was supposedly full blooded cherokee. i have seen pictures and i do not doubt it. my mother looks very indian herself. darker skin, dark brown hair, dark brown eyes.

myself, i have blond hair and blue eyes, so i look nothing of the part.

all of my ancestors and 99% of my living relatives live in sylva NC, which is just a few miles outside of the cherokee indian reservation.

i like to think that what little bit of indian blood i have in me is why i love to hunt so much. :)


#6 OFFLINE   oak1971

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Posted Sep. 16 2008 - 05:55 PM

I am just a boring white guy. :sad:


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#7 OFFLINE   hsracer201

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Posted Sep. 16 2008 - 05:57 PM

I am just a boring white guy. :sad:



maybe, but you have a sweet .44mag on the way to make up for it. :thumb:

that makes you ok in my book. :laugh:


#8 ONLINE   TomJefferson

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Posted Sep. 16 2008 - 06:07 PM

No not really, The Baker Roll was from a 1924 act proposal by a Agent of the Government Edward Baker to wrench governmental control away from the Cherokee. It was a list of all members of the Cherokee Nation. Though it failed, the Cherokee nation still uses the list to determine membership into the tribe. The Dawes list is the government list on distribution of land or federal benefits. Tribal affiliation is set by the tribe not the government and often doesn't have anything to do with land distribution but only tribal status.

Only Indians living on the reservation between 1898 and 1914 and their decedents are considered Indians per the Dawes List. While the Cherokee Baker list included Cherokee that were not on reservation land and is the tribe guideline for lineage.

I guess they figured the US Government didn't have the right to tell them their children were not Indian just because they weren't living on the reservation.

Tj


#9 OFFLINE   scotto

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Posted Sep. 16 2008 - 08:14 PM

No not really, The Baker Roll was from a 1924 act proposal by a Agent of the Government Edward Baker to wrench governmental control away from the Cherokee. It was a list of all members of the Cherokee Nation. Though it failed, the Cherokee nation still uses the list to determine membership into the tribe. The Dawes list is the government list on distribution of land or federal benefits. Tribal affiliation is set by the tribe not the government and often doesn't have anything to do with land distribution but only tribal status.

Only Indians living on the reservation between 1898 and 1914 and their decedents are considered Indians per the Dawes List. While the Cherokee Baker list included Cherokee that were not on reservation land and is the tribe guideline for lineage.

I guess they figured the US Government didn't have the right to tell them their children were not Indian just because they weren't living on the reservation.

Tj

Interesting I didn’t know that but then again my knowledge of American Indian history is mostly confined to woodland and plains Indians. Our band, White Earth, has in the last few years started to issue decedent cards to children of enrolled members that allows them cretin tribal rights that are controlled by the band. Like hunting, fishing and gathering rights and free health care at the new state of the art White Earth Indian health center, the works, medical, dental and prescription drugs.

OK This is NOT directed at anyone here and I do NOT dought anyone but there are jokes around Indian country about being “part Cherokee”

It seems that whenever someone that is non-tribal says that they are “part Indian” it it always turn out to be Cherokee?

It’s not that tribal people doubt their sincerity. It’s just that as ethnic diversity becomes more accepted in society family stories about Indian heritage seem commonplace. But why is it always Cherokee? Maybe it has something to do with media: going back to Daniel Boone on TV and his sidekick, Mingo, the friendly Cherokee, or the song, Cherokee People, and the popular Jeep Cherokee, and all the celebrities that clam Cherokee ancestry. Like the Dixie chicks, Loretta Lynn, Tina Turner and of course Cher, with her hit song, Half Breed. Again, it’s not that I doubt the person’s family story of Cherokee ancestry. But I wonder since so much of the family story has been lost, how much of the family’s story has been embellished? Without any other details of their Indian ancestry, it would just sound more credible if the person could name a tribe other than the default Cherokee. It’s amazing how often Cherokee ancestry comes up in family stories and folklore, and even more amazing when the great, great, great grandmother or grandfather is described as a chief or Indian princess. Kind of like if someone met a visitor from Scotland, and in conversation told that visitor that there great, great grandfather was a Duke or Earl. His response would probably be, “Oh, really, which one?” to which you could only shrug.

My self I am a Sagawadee- Anishinaabeg (Mixed blood Indian). My father is full blooded Norwegian and my mother is ½ Ojibwe and ½ Norwegian. I have light hair and green eyes, not your typical Indian. However I grew up on the reservation as did my mother and Grand parents and my great Grand parents and so on and so on, it is my home and they are my people.

Again please don’t take offence as I do not dought anyones clam here of native ancestry.

We are all brothers…

Edited by scotto, Sep. 16 2008 - 09:24 PM.



#10 OFFLINE   louie

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Posted Sep. 16 2008 - 09:19 PM

Well I occasionally smoke a pipe and drink fire water, does this count? :unsure:

Otherwise, I am of European descent.

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Posted Sep. 16 2008 - 09:36 PM

Does growing up on the edge of the Mesquakie Indian Settlement, going to school and partying with full blooded Mesquakie's count for anything :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

If not I'm just an 100% bred and borne American mutt of Irish, Dutch, Dane, English a a few other mixes I've forgotten about :tongue: :tongue:


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#12 OFFLINE   scotto

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Posted Sep. 16 2008 - 09:40 PM

Does growing up on the edge of the Mesquakie Indian Settlement, going to school and partying with full blooded Mesquakie's count for anything :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:



Yes it do… :thumb:


#13 ONLINE   TomJefferson

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Posted Sep. 16 2008 - 09:49 PM

Well actually here where we live is the ancestral home of the Cherokee. The res is just a few miles from here. The land my home sits on was once Cherokee land and just a few miles from here is the only remaining fort of "The Trail of Tears".

A lot of people would like to forget the history of the Cherokee for many reasons. Though they did fight with the French during the French and Indian War, they never really had a history of warfare but the exact opposite and a history long before the white man of a peaceful existence. Unlike the nomadic tribes across the land, the Cherokee held to their ancestral land. Way before recorded history, the tribe had warred with the Indian tribes of Ohio. Very rare in early American history, they made a treaty with those nations that lasted for who knows how many years to have a buffer land between the nations. That was what was called and still called today Kentucky. This was to be not settled by any of the nations but open to all for hunting. It was by no mistake that Daniel Boone chose Kentucky to settle. Though the movie and TV series show all this Indian action, reality was compared to most settlements Boonesborough had very little due to this same treaty that way preceded his going through the Cumberland Gap.

In a big part to the natural isolation of the Smoky Mountains or heck even the Appalachians, the Cherokee lived in isolation and in peace. It was not uncommon for them to marry settlers. Heck, those settlers themselves in a big part to the same mountain isolation were cut off from mainstream society. The same bigotry, only good Indian is a dead one stuff just didn't exist here. My wife's families roots for example was the Big Sandy valley just due north of where the reservation is now. Isolated rural people years back where much different than today and it was not uncommon for a man to approach marriage very purposefully like going out to find them self a wife. Cherokee wives were highly respected and sought after since they like the rural settlers were steeped in family tradition as well as the traditional family role. Better yet by the early 1800s they were predominate Christian. In fact, my wife's grandfather was a minister and his Cherokee bride one of his parishioners.

These were no backward people living a nomadic hunter gather life style but every bit as cultured as the white man. With a strong sense of land ownership, they were always farmers. By the time of the "Trail of Tears" 1838, their homes and farms in TN and GA reviled any in the area.

Georgia however does not share that much of the geography of eastern TN, NC, and KY. The mountains were not a barrier for white settlement. The wagons didn't have to cross the mountains but go around them from the south. In the early 1800s, Georgia's population multiplied 6-10 times. Imagine now, the Cherokees living in very nice homes and large well established producing farms and the new white settlers in shacks and you have the picture. Though by law the white man could not remove the Cherokee taking their land, this was even upheld by the supreme court, the same melting into the population that kept the Cherokee safe from genocide was their same undoing. Accepting American laws and melting into society, the tribal leadership fell into segments. Who was chief just wasn't all that important since they were for all purposes Americans. Seeing this as an opportunity, corrupt politicians got one of the, actually very small segment, chiefs to sign a treaty signing the land away. An Army was immediately sent in to gather the people up from their homes and force march them to reservations in Oklahoma. This was the Trail of Tears as many of them died in the process.

You have to remember where the folks who settled Appalachia were just like the Cherokee family farmers, those who settled Georgia were plantation owners and slave owners. Where the color of ones skin meant very little in Appalachia, in fact it still does even today, it was a major issue in Georgia.

One segment of the tribe those in E. Tennessee/North Carolina refused to move and once again the mountains that so isolated them from early warfare now protected them from mass exportation. This is now know as Cherokee North Carolina.

From that day to this day, there really never has been a close tie between those Cherokee who managed to stay in their ancestral lands and those sent to Oklahoma. For all purposes, in 1838 the Cherokee Nation became two tribes. Though the people still here felt for their kindred brothers and what happened to them, they wanted no part in dealing with the same tribal leaders that brought that mess on their people either. It sure wasn't those who resisted the white man put into power in Oklahoma.

Though the Cherokee had many hardships and what one may call a pacifist past compared to other tribes, they certainly fared much better than 90% of the Eastern tribes which most pushed west by continual wars with the white man were killed or absorbed by the plains Indians which cared no more for their migration into their lands than they later did the white man. See many Mohawks? Just think about it, in the 1700s the largest most organized Indian nation in the North American continent was in the state of Ohio. The Chipewa, Deleware, Erie, Miami, Honniasont, Illinois, Iroquois, Kickapoo, and Mosopelea once all great nations in their own right even 200 years later if around at all are shadows of what they once were. They were all in Ohio at one time and now for the most part only the names of rivers and streams they named remain.

Even as early as the 1500s, explorers called the Cherokee the most advanced of north American native culture. Though Americans and apparently even native American's like to think of them as those poor fools from Oklahoma who dressed up as Abe Lincoln, that's about as far from reality as the just as wrong "noble Indian". As a tribe they were and still are today an industrious hard working people with a strong sense ethics. They survived by adapting. Alliance by marriage is a form adaptation for like the white man once was family was stronger than governments.

There simply are a hell of a lot of people that have Cherokee ancestry espcially here where they are from and live yet today. I have a number of Cherokee families in my subdivision and OMG my neighbors son married a white woman.

Tj

Oh btw, when my wife is approached on the topic it isn't show me your white card but "What you aren't Cherokee?" :thumbsup:

BTW2, I have no doubt Cher is as well, she looks it. In fact, my wife use to always be compared to Cher. Yep, you want to know why Cherokee were sought after as wives, many of them looked like Cher. :) Man I could tell you stories when I was a kid about the hot Indian chicks...........whoa, good memories.


#14 OFFLINE   scotto

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Posted Sep. 17 2008 - 07:26 AM

Excellent post TJ :thumbsup:

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#15 ONLINE   TomJefferson

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Posted Sep. 17 2008 - 08:29 AM

Excellent post TJ :thumbsup:

Megwitch Neegie


Thanks but though a major history buff especially the area I grew up in, I don't have an Indian heritage other than myself and my family before me having always lived around the Cherokee.

My wife though tied with blood is far removed from the Cherokee traditions, if there truly are any. Quite honestly the Cherokee was so absorbed by American culture so many years ago if it wasn't for the reservation system, there wouldn't be a tribe here at all.

To no surprise the almost national anthem of the Cherokee is "Cherokee Nation/Indian Reservation" by Paul Revere and the Raiders and the song about sums them up.

Indian Reservation
( Paul Revere and the Raiders )

They took the whole Cherokee Nation
And put us on this reservation
Took away our ways of life
The tomahawk and the bow and knife

They took away our native tongue
And taught their English to our young
And all the beads we made by hand
Are nowadays made in Japan

Cherokee people, Cherokee tribe
So proud to live, so proud to die

They took the whole Indian Nation
And locked us on this reservation
And though I wear a shirt and tie
I’m still a red man deep inside

Cherokee people, Cherokee tribe
So proud to live, so proud to die

But maybe someday when they learn
Cherokee Nation will return
Will return
Will return
Will return
Will return

The problem is they have to find out what there was to return to. As a distinct culture here its almost extinct and Cherokee the odds are if you see Indian stuff its from China and immolates the plains Indians and has nothing to do with the Cherokee which never ever lived in Teepees. In fact, with the new found wealth from gambling even the Indians working the tourist traps are for the most part not Cherokee anymore but from the poorer tribes out west. Millions of dollars flow into the res every year mainly in the form of tourist dollars and it most certainly hasn't been overlooked by the people who live there. Its those decedents from those who left the res decades ago many to work in building this country that live outside the res in the surrounding areas.

It really is difficult to equate the Cherokee here to Indians in the rest of the country. Its vastly different.

Tj


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Posted Sep. 17 2008 - 09:02 AM

My sister and I are both adopted. Her adoption papers listed her as 1/4 Cherokee. She looks as white as I do.
A few years back she contacted her biological parents who happened to be living in Nebraska. They were all excited to meet.
Her biological dad was full blooded Cherokee. She brought back pictures of the family. Her bio dad had long hair, braids the whole bit. Impressive. The rest of the family was mixed white and Indian.

I have lived in and around Reservations all my life, mostly here in the Southwest. Here in the Mesilla area we have descendants of the Apaches.
Up north in Taos its Pueblo, furrther North in the Farmington/Durango area where I lived for many years, there were Navajo's & Southern Utes.

Reservations always have the best damn hunting anywhere. :wink:


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#17 OFFLINE   scotto

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    I come from the land of the ice and snow,


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Posted Sep. 17 2008 - 09:16 AM

Reservations always have the best damn hunting anywhere. :wink:

Ya got that right specially in arias reserved for tribal and descendent hunting only…
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#18 OFFLINE   REDMAN

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Posted Sep. 17 2008 - 10:56 AM

I have'nt heard of these "white cards" before now. but i am enrolled member of Crow nation. 1/2 Crow , 1/4 Pawnee and rest of me is Scotch Irish and Russian. I doubt my kids will be able to be enrolled. :)


#19 OFFLINE   RallySoob

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Posted Sep. 17 2008 - 12:30 PM

I have Oklahoma Cherokee in my blood. Enough to get the check but we weren't registered because my grandfather had an affair w/ an indian gal back in the day which is the line I come from. My dad's side has some BlackFoot in us which explains our aggressiveness and athletic ability.
My good friend is a Chehalis Native, His dad looks like Chief Joseph...

Me & My Indian bud...
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My favorite shirt...
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Edited by RallySoob, Sep. 17 2008 - 12:32 PM.



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