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Screwball

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  1. Screwball

    9mm

    CMMG does the Banshee, which I’m going to be picking up... but I think they do a rifle version of it. Drawing a blank on the name. With an AR in 9mm, most are blowback. Heavy bolt means more weight, especially moving mass during cycling (increased recoil... not terrible, but something to have to overcome to a degree). I have a .45 D/I AR, and comparing it to a blowback .45... it is a very noticeable difference. If I have the option, I’d go with some other locking system. Not that it helps you, but PTR also does a pistol version of both the MP5 and MP5K. Another good weapon system that doesn’t use traditional blowback. But it lends itself to the “pistol” setup, since 16” MP5 is unwieldy. Moving away from ARs, think CZ and SIG do rifle versions of the Evo and MPX.
  2. Screwball

    Cr 123a

    I used to keep batteries in the refrigerator, but when I went on an insulin pump, the manufacturer recommended not to store batteries that way. Switched, and noticed no difference in battery life. For brand, I also standardized on Energizer for standard batteries (AAA, and alike). Duracell would cause low battery alarms to go off for two weeks before the battery was actually drained (ended up changing them out early). They have similar lives, but one thinks it is dying way before it actually is. For lights, I use Surefire. I've been meaning to look into cheaper brands, but just never got around to it.
  3. Screwball

    Buckshot vs. Birdshot For Home Defense

    Got to love reading comprehension... how about you go back and reread the last sentence you bolded, and then the fourth paragraph quoted? I never said birdshot, even in very limited circumstances, won't kill someone. Hell, beanbag rounds can kill if used improperly (why it is called less-lethal opposed to non-lethal). Problem is that you are not guaranteed to make a contact or close contact shot in any home defense scenario. Your original statement said it WILL stop a threat... no mention of distance, or any other restriction. So, Whittington proves your statement to be false... as does countless numbers of cases that did not result in death. Because you sat in on one Grand Jury that had one of the few limited deaths by birdshot, doesn't mean departments should start swapping out their buckshot for it. All your posts do is show there isn't any consistency in birdshot effectiveness in defensive situations. It is like saying .22 will kill you... yes, it can, but in very limited circumstances. Robert Kennedy died from it, but not five other people that were hit in the same incident. Ronald Reagan didn't die from it, nor anyone else involved in that attempt (four total... being I don't call someone dying 33 years later a testament to lethality). It doesn't have the track record or capability to fill in for my 9mm SIG P938 or S&W 642-1 (converted). At close range (same distance we are talking about possible fatal birdshot wounds), buckshot will do a similar wound... if not better. If the wad opens up, you have smaller pellets going a similar speed as larger pellets of buckshot. If speed is identical (more or less... even if we consider 1,200 FPS target loads verses 1,325 FPS, I'd call it the same; there are faster birdshot loads), a pellet with smaller mass will not have the energy to penetrate as deep as one with a larger mass. Just because of a Glaser slug type situation up to close range may be devastating, once the pattern opens up, you aren't getting any serious penetration (Whittington, for example). Switch out the birdshot for buckshot, the mass of the pellets will penetrate considerably deeper... increasing the likelihood of a wound that will stop the threat. With a similar wound at close range, and less effectiveness at further distances, the role of birdshot is extremely narrow in defensive situations. It is not a guaranteed threat stopper, nor should be acted like it is. It works great for birds and little clay targets, though.
  4. Screwball

    Buckshot vs. Birdshot For Home Defense

    Really? Go tell Harry Whittington that... he was the 78 year old that Dick Cheney shot. Pretty sure he is still alive, even though he probably is around 90. People always act like birdshot will do the job... it will not. It will not kill the person outright, being you aren't connecting with the central nervous system or draining enough blood out of the threat. People don't usually die from birdshot wounds. I forget which forum I was in a thread regarding this subject, and a guy said he knew of someone who almost died from it, and the only reason he didn't was because of the close proximity of a hospital... well, the guy didn't die (it was drug related and, if I remember correctly, self inflicted). Google dogs being shot by birdshot. There are countless examples of dogs taking 100+ pellets of birdshot, and while they may be blind and look horrible, many survive. Birdshot was designed to take birds... obviously. Lots of small pellets for a fast moving target, which is small enough that the pellets can take it out. Shy of putting the muzzle on the target or within a few feet of the muzzle, you are not getting this "massive" wound. You may get something that looks nasty, but likely isn't life threatening. People aren't birds. We don't have the same body makeup, and have a lot more fat surrounding our organs. Go with buckshot or slugs if you are planning on meeting a human threat. Better chance to put the threat out of the equation (sorry, but I'm not pissing someone off with birdshot if I am using deadly force to defend myself). If you are worrying about a flock of birds, birdshot will work for you in that limited circumstances.
  5. Screwball

    One more reason to hate on plastic lowers....

    I picked up a three pack of TNArms lowers, and it was a huge waste of money/time. First, the buffer retainer pin holes were drilled too far forward or the brass thread inserts for the buffer tube were too far back. Sent them back, and their solution was to put it on a belt sander (actually, they suggested I do it myself). None of them came out square. Takedown pins were tight, but I dealt with it. The last straw was the restriction on the bolt release... which was being slowed down enough to not work on my .45 D/I build (would not lock back on empty magazine). Took the upper and magazine adapter and installed on my built DPMS lower, and worked 100%. It may have worked on a 5.56mm build, but when it doesn't work for me, confidence won't be there. I originally wanted to do the .45 build, an FDE build, and the third would be a rainy day lower... sent them all back, and with the $150 refund, picked up a Spikes to build the .45. But I'm out my time, shipping twice to TNArms, and the transfer fees on the three lowers. Hassle was not worth the few ounces you save. And my .45 build got under 6 pounds with a forged lower.
  6. Screwball

    Selling A gun?.....get a FFL

    Seems like a good time for me to get moving on my three AR builds... .45 upper should be ordered tomorrow. [emoji106] Seriously, I doubt it will get too far. It is a blatant overstepping of power, and I don't think the Legislative or Judicial Branches are going to let someone make them look that unimportant. Appearances is like 95% of what those people worry about.
  7. Screwball

    Man on motorized wheelchair given DUI citation

    That is correct... I know someone who made a DUI arrest on a lawnmower... but the driver was also driving down the middle of a 55 MPH highway. Even if you are sitting in the driver's seat of the vehicle, not driving, you can be charged with DUI in certain situations. With the lawnmower, they had to write him for unregistered/uninsured vehicle and a seatbelt violation, due to the circumstances (guy hit a car and got very messed up). Now, most people would say that is outrageous... but if L/E doesn't, then the same media that makes it look stupid will say they are letting drunks rule the road.
  8. Screwball

    Looking To Bead Blast Two Pistols

    S&W charges the same for an entire stainless pistol... so that would be a similar price ($155) for the 1006. Novak, who is far a "Billy Bob gunsmith," charges $95 for the same work. The other gunsmith I use, who I mentioned that I'm trying to move away from, also quoted me under $100 for the same pistol (that is also with free installation of my adjustable Trijicons)... and even with the issues I've had (mainly billing problems), they do unbelievable work. Also, please don't preach to someone that is being economical with their funds. I've spent more than twice that amount (about $380) refinishing my Beretta that I use for competition. Spending money for quality work doesn't bother me... but throwing away money does.
  9. I've been looking around to bead blast my 1006, as well as install the adjustable night sights that I picked up. My 1006 has a few light marks, nothing major, but the one thing I wanted to do was remove the "Refer to Manual" warning on the side. So far, I've only looked at Novak in doing the work (have another company that usually does my refinishing, but I am trying to move away from them after past experiences). If I do, I might also look at their other packages, but it would likely only be the reliability package. I’m ok with the trigger, so no point in their trigger job. I'm looking to bead blast my 629, as well. It has a few marks inside the arm, but looks ok. The only time I've looked into it was through S&W, which I was interested in their Combat Revolver Package. But to be honest, I feel that $155 to bead blast one pistol is a bit much. Preferably, I'd like to send both out to the same place to save on shipping. Any suggestions, I'd appreciate it.
  10. Screwball

    Optic Mounts Picatinny vs Weaver

    When I looked to mount a scope on my Spikes .22 upper, I bought the correct Picatinny rings for it. The rings that came with the scope would not fit, so I had to buy new ones... When I put the sight on my 5.56mm upper (Bushnell Trophy MP), it is a Weaver mount. The two screws lined up with the slots, which I knew from reading reviews on it. Didn't move forward/back before I tightened it, so it is good for me.
  11. Screwball

    Barrel Project On S&W Forum

    I saw a post on S&W Forum, which pretty much said that BarSto withdrew their interest... he said if he finds someone else to make them, he will repost.
  12. http://smith-wessonforum.com/showthread.php?t=88706 Saw the link on AR15.com.
  13. Screwball

    Anyone flipping out and buying mags??

    With the Glock 21, you can use the standard magazines in a SF frame, just need to have the non-ambidextrous magazine release (I've read that there were some SF guns that came with them, early on). The difference is there is a slot on both sides of the magazine to catch the release, compared to the one side on the standard frames. If you are a righty, then really shouldn't be a problem. If you are a lefty, you can go the SF route, or just get the magazines and release for it. My backorder through MidwayUSA did not go through, so I found some new Glock 21 magazines on AR15.com for $150 (total of seven). Considering shipping, I feel it was an ok price to definitely have them sent to me. I do want to get another handgun, but still unsure. I saw a nice 1026, which I would be set in regards to magazines, but also looking into a J-frame.
  14. Well, I've been looking hard at what the next handgun platform I want to go with. Even though it will likely be in the beginning of next year (tax check ), I just purchased several Glock 21 magazines from a member on AR15.com. I wanted to go with a Glock 35 and a Beretta PX4 in .45, with the possibility of an additional Glock 26, but looking at magazine prices and aftermarket parts (in the Beretta's case, finish), I really shouldn't get that involved in too many pistols. I'm going to pick up the 21, and then have LoneWolf build me a .45 Tactical slide for it. Considering I will still have the OEM .45 slide, I am looking into ways to utilize it. I figured that the .400 Corbon would be an easy solution. Swap out the barrel, guide rod (I want a stainless look), and likely a heavier recoil spring... and then I'm set. The only question I have rolling around is, do I really need to? I've read up on the .400 Corbon, and being I already have the S&W 1006, I'd only be gaining similar performance out of a polymer framed pistol with a 13 round capacity. Looking at it, I may opt for the 21C, and then put the ported slide for sale online. That way, I can get some money back and reinvest it into something else (looking into either a .380 or a .38 J-frame, minus the lock; but I'm sure something else will come up ). Figured I'd ask to see if anyone shot or still shoots the .400 Corbon and the 10mm. I like the ability to swap calibers (like my Beretta 92 with the 96 slide), but I don't want to invest money into something I will never use. I sold my .22 Ciener kit for that very same reason.
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