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Qweevox

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  1. I'd suggest you continue on diet modification. My father's progress has been steady but slow. He was first diagnosed with Type 2 in his late 50's. It progressed into his 70's, BECAUSE he didn't really modify his SAD diet until 74. At 80 he is off daily insulin injections and glipizide. I won't say his insulin resistance is cured, but it's in remission as long as he remains LCHF. His physical activity and exercise is limited due to other medical conditions. That's what Type 2 diabetes is, it's insulin resistance. In the early stages, it's actually hyperinsulinemia. In late young adulthood (20's and 30's) the pancreas is pumping out boatloads of insulin trying to deal with the standard American diet, so it remains asymptomatic for a very long time, usually not showing up until middle-age. This is the exact opposite of Type 1 diabetes which is a lack of the pancreas's ability to produce insulin. Type 1 and Type 2 are two entirely different diseases marked by the same symptom, high blood glucose. Your cells are insulin resistant. Continue the exercise and a LCHF diet. You might also consider trying fasting. You need to lower your insulin resistance.
  2. If you tested after strenuous exercise or physical activity that's what caused your elevated blood glucose readings. My A1c is 4.4-4.7. It was at 4.7 in June. This means on average my blood glucose level is 83-88 mg/dl. My lowest daily test was in the upper 40's without symptoms of hypoglycemia. But after a hard run, or work-out my blood glucose can be as high as the 110-120's mg/dl. Your activity level affects your readings. I track both my blood glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate levels. They tend to offset each other depending on activity.
  3. What kind of physical activity are you doing during the day? Also how many grams of protein did you eat, gluconeogenesis can be a factor for some people. For most it's not, gluconeogenesis seems to be a demand pathway. While it's unlikely that's what happened, it's possible. My wife and I care for my father, who had type 2 diabetes. It took a few years of keto for him to get off insulin injections and glipizide. When he and my mother came to live with us, it was fairly easy because we've been LCHF for over 20 years and since he nor my mother can drive now, they don't have access to junk food. We pretty much eat LCHF and we fast as well. Seldom do we eat breakfast in our household. So lunch is usually his first meal of the day. We eat a lot of green leafy and cruciferous vegetables in our house, and most of our protein comes from fish now. But we also eat beef, chicken, pork, and venison. As we've gotten older ourselves we've cut back significantly on the protein we eat.
  4. (I image Don McLean's song American Pie playing softly in the background as I write this) This is a great FRED interactive chart (link at the bottom ) showing the death blow to free-market capitalism, and its aftermath through to today. It shows the dramatic expansion of the Federal Reserves balance sheet, which I like to think of as the great "financial morphine experiment". It clearly shows their failure in their stated desire to unwind this mess, and now the uptick that's underway without much talk. QE, or Quantitative Easing, was unthinkable before 2008. Something that was dangerous and in the long run wouldn't work. The Federal Reserve was printing extra money, above and beyond what our Federal government already does when they run deficits. They were also buying assets that no one on the free-market wanted to buy at the price offered. So they were supporting prices. In this case, they currently support low-interest rates by supporting fixed income financial instruments. Public and private debt is so high today, allowing real interest rates to rise would be the end. If they allowed interest rates to rise to the heights they did in the '80s, our tax receipts wouldn't even cover the interest payment on our debt. Not to mention corporate or private debt. The economy would completely collapse. The problem with these things is they take years, and sometimes decades to manifest the full damage they do. So the general public goes along thinking everything is fine, and normalcy bias keeps them calm and sedate, "...well nothing bad has happened before so nothing bad will happen in the future". These monetary policy tools are like financial morphine or meth. They don't do the economy any good, they don't weed out failed business models, moral hazard, or bad ideas. They allow money, wealth, and power to concentrate in the hands of those who benefit the most, the wealthy. Who can essentially borrow large sums of money at negative real interest rates (Free money). Many of these wealthy people and corporations should lose. They shouldn't be in business or wealthy anymore. They should have lost their ass back in 2008. That's why cyclical depressions/recessions are actually healthy for the economy. It takes the money and moves capital out of the hands of the weak, stupid, and reckless, and rewards the intelligent, conservative, and prudent. It resets the balance between debtors and savers. The leveraged lose their assets to the savers who can buy them at lower prices. And the economy moves on. https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/WALCL Bush: ‘I’ve Abandoned Free Market Principles To Save The Free Market System’-Fall 2008 It wasn't GWB's fault what happened. This has been the death by a thousand cuts going back decades. But it is the death of capitalism as we know it.
  5. Qweevox

    Keto Lifestyle/ sort of diet.......

    These days I'm mostly LCHF and not keto, I eat a lot of vegetables. But I do fasting as well, so I do get thrown into heavy keto a few times a week, and a few times a year I like to do longer fasts of 7-14 days for overall health and longevity. I've been on the keto wagon for years, so long now that I don't really think about it, or talk about much. It's just the way I eat. I've never had elevated blood glucose levels or significant insulin resistance. But my father did. His health started to decline in his 50's, and by his 60's he was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. By his late 60's his diabetes had progressed enough where he was talking glipizide and daily insulin injections. His endocrinologist said that his diabetes would continue to progress, requiring more and more prescription medication. ....He changed doctors. He changed his diet and went LCHF, most of his oil sources changed to extra virgin olive oil, coconut oil, avocado oil, fish oil, and he cut out the crappy corn, canola, and other typical American vegetable oils. On a high-fat diet, not only did he "cure" his type 2 diabetes, but his cholesterol levels became amazing. His triglycerides levels are consistently low, and his LDL to HDL ratio is fantastic. He's also adopted eating windows. Basically skipping breakfast altogether, and eating his first meal around 12 or 1 pm each day. He also eats dinner. The majority of his daily calories come from fats, the majority of the volume of what he eats comes from raw vegetables, and he gets about 100 grams of high-quality protein per day. This has allowed him to come off most of the medication he once took. His cardio ejection fraction has gone from 26% to 55%, his Kidney function has rebounded from a low of 25% to 71%. All not bad for a man who is now in his 80's, and really didn't start to try to improve his physical condition until his 70's. The message being it's never too late. Also, what you eat is much more powerful than the medication you're prescribed. The SAD (Standard American Diet) causes a lot of hospital stays, lots of medication, and in the end a miserable life. (Here's a 275-page thread with a lot of personal experiences in it: https://www.ar15.com/forums/general/Official-Keto-thread-Now-with-roll-call-poll-/5-1872921/ )
  6. Some forums I'm a member of are purely used for technical information. For example, I have a few black powder forums I go to just for information or discussion on things related to black powder shooting and firearms. There's not really much social exchange on those forums. Then I have forums like this one where I enjoy more of the "general discussion". While they're also good for technical information, they're a little more social to me. A place where you can discuss a broad range of ideas, or news stories.
  7. Something doesn't smell right. Of course, the media is sensationalizing it somewhat, and there is little information to go on except timing conjecture and common sense. Unless the young man driving the truck was somehow involved in the smuggling operation, he's innocent. Even if those people climbed into the truck right after he picked it up, there is no way they froze to death or suffocated in the short amount of time he was hauling the trailer.
  8. A 25-year-old driver named Mo Robinson, from Northern Ireland was arrested on suspicion of murder after 39 bodies of migrants were found in his lorry in Essex in one of Britain's biggest-ever mass murder probes after the grisly discovery in Grays, at 1.40am today. https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/10174799/essex-lorry-bodies-driver-news/ This makes no sense to me. Robinson picked up the trailer at 12:30 AM, and police discovered the bodies at 1:40 AM, 70 minutes later. It's suggested that the migrants (illegal aliens) had suffocated in the trailer. Unless the kid was part of the smuggling operation and knew he had 39 illegals in his trailer, I don't see how he can possibly be involved in the murder. Truck drivers throughout Europe have complained about the problem of illegals stowing away on their trucks. It sounds like these 39 were in the trailer when Robinson picked it up at 12:30. If he wasn't involved he wouldn't have known they were in there, and if they suffocated more then likely they suffocated before he picked up the trailer. This case makes no sense to me.
  9. It warms my heart to see the firearms make their way back into the hands of private citizens.
  10. Qweevox

    You know when somethings just not quite Right

    I can't believe that's the first time I thought of that. That is hilarious.
  11. Qweevox

    Simply Unacceptable and Disgraceful !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    The 2nd Amendment already doesn't exist in pockets of this country. Hell, the bill of rights no longer exists. They are just words on parchment when the government can take your firearms, your property, without due process, we are in a post-constitutional era. We have a President in office who suggested it, and states and municipalities that are doing it. Anything goes now. The seal has been broken. It's wide open for anything. The Republic is on life-support.
  12. This is the biggest flaw with a populist president. They listen to the loudest voices and tend to behave as if we live in a democracy and not a republic designed to protect the INDIVIDUAL from the mob. There are people in the country who would gleefully give up all their freedom for a feeling of security and safety. They tend to be incredibly vocal and demonstrate for a cause. That's what mobs do. They tend to be driven by what I call the feminine mind. The feminine aspect of human nature is wired to value security and safety over freedom. The reason we have the Bill of Rights is that these ideas were supposed to be non-negotiable and off the government's table. Or at least require the extraordinary will and effort to amend the constitution. He's a New York liberal who has openingly stated in writing and in interviews his view on firearms and the 2nd Amendment "I generally oppose gun control, but I support the ban on assault weapons and I support a slightly longer waiting period to purchase a gun. With today’s Internet technology we should be able to tell within 72-hours if a potential gun owner has a record."--Donald Trump “I like taking the guns early, like in this crazy man’s case that just took place in Florida ... to go to court would have taken a long time. Take the guns first, go through due process second,”--Donald Trump Trump may be the best option we have when it comes to the 2nd Amendment, but he is by no means a supporter of it.
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