Jump to content

Qweevox

Members
  • Content Count

    420
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

106 Excellent

Profile Information

  • Location
    Southeast
  • State and Country Flags
    Scotland

Recent Profile Visitors

501 profile views
  1. Qweevox

    The chinese are lying but how much?

    The CCP lies, it always lies, and always will lie. There is no way China had the numbers they reported with their very communal huge total population, coupled with their weak healthcare system. I mean these people eat out of the same pot, they don't wash their hands, in most provinces hocking up phlegm and spitting on the street is normal. And when I say they have a huge spitting problem I mean it. No one talks about it in the west, but if you've been there and seen it you'll understand what I mean. The mainland Chinese spit everywhere. Their wet markets are nasty and dirty, and in high-density areas, the pollution is terrible. ....and yet they reported that only 81k people got the disease, and most of them survived it. The CCP is a criminal organization, you can't believe anything they say.
  2. Qweevox

    Glad to see The Armory back.

    It's been down off and on for two days. I think people should try to get more members here from AR15.com as an alternate account. We should all be actively trying to do that. It would help the site and cause.
  3. I agree. Until we start to see the sigmoid curve of new infections start to level out social distancing is the only responsible thing to do. While I agree there is no reason to panic as others continually recommend, sticking your head in the sand and allowing normalcy bias or whacho conspiracy theories about "fake news" are equally bad. At this point in time, social distancing and practicing reasonable sanitary practices are necessary. If possible limit your exposure to other people. If not for yourself and your family do it for others. It's at the very least callus, and potentially a huge fallacy to assume this is only going to cause serious medical complications in the elderly and physically weak. And if you believe it's not real, I don't know what to say except good luck with that. People don't have to die for this to have a serious impact on lives and our economy. Take productive people out of the economy for weeks can do it as well. Pretending like SARS-CoV2 is a nothing to be concerned about is probably a natural fear response in and of itself. A form of denial, that is potentially dangerous. It's your ego trying to comfort itself. Caseloads have not peaked in the US. Not yet. In Georgia only 1800 people have been tested, of those almost 300 were infected. Meaning there are probably many more thousands walking around asymptomatic or undiagnosed. Hopefully, some of the therapies being proposed will prove useful, and eventually, we'll have a vaccine for this virus. We will get past this. But the ONLY thing that has worked so far is social distancing.
  4. I think the combo malaria/HIV drug looks promising for those that end up with the Chinese virus. That's the kind of thing that could turn this whole thing around fast. If doctors can keep people from dying from the Wuh-flu or at least drop it down significantly everyone will relax.
  5. How one small Italian town cut coronavirus cases to zero in just a few weeks CORONAVIRUS SCIENCE AND NEWThis mass testing revealed that about 3% of residents were infected with the virus, and of these, about half did not show any symptoms blog of the Stigler Center at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. After two weeks of a strict lockdown and quarantine of cases, only 0.25% of residents were infected. The town isolated these last few cases and has since reopened.
  6. I appreciate your advice and think most people probably feel the same way. But my wife and I are the caregivers for my elderly parents 79 and 81, so while we're not as worried about our kids, or even ourselves for that matter because we're both in pretty good shape, we are concerned about them. So our whole household has to act as if we're all in our 70s and 80s because if one of us goes about our daily lives and contracts the disease, it's could mean a death sentence for two people we care about.
  7. The interviewee is credentialed and credible. Short version: Dr Paul Cottrell believes and makes the argument that Covid-19 is a manufactured virus. The interview gets fairly technical but very worth watching. Paul Cottrell received his BS and MBA from Wayne State University, Ph.D. from Walden University and pre-medicial curriculum from Fordham University. He is currently at Harvard University for an ALM in Biology. His research includes using chaos theory to model financial markets and economic emergence. His work on economic emergence contains new theoretical concepts of economic evolution and the creation of self organizational structures. In addition, Dr. Paul Cottrell has published works from his Harvard University studies in genomics, neurobiology, neurosurgery, endocrinology and microbiota.
  8. Qweevox

    Some Sound advice from Darrell Holland

    Interesting interview for the more conspiracy-minded among us.
  9. Qweevox

    Some Sound advice from Darrell Holland

    I think we are in agreement.
  10. Qweevox

    Some Sound advice from Darrell Holland

    You're assuming this will hurt Trump's reelection. I'm not in that camp. I think the administration has a tremendous opportunity here, and I think they're doing the best they can to handle the situation. Trump's basically implemented or suggested the implementation of everything the Biden camp has suggested. So when the debates come around the Democrats won't be able to sling much mud at Trump on this one. Next, I think we're ahead of this thing. Something the Chinese and Italians didn't do. Our healthcare system is able to handle the current loads, and if people act responsibly I think we can keep our mortality rate very low. The people who need ICU beds and ventilators will have them. But only if we flatten the curve. Italy didn't or wasn't able to do that. China denied it was a problem for weeks or months, and suppressed all their data, and wouldn't allow international assessment teams to get ahead of this problem. They continue to do this by recently kicking out international reporters and journalists and disappearing Chinese citizens reporting on the ground conditions there. If things are so good why not show the world, and let it be known? This virus isn't something to be trifled with. Sars-CoV2 (Covid-19) is a serious situation. Sars-CoV burned itself out in the early '00s and Mers-CoV did as well. Neither was a pandemic. But this one is spreading. This is not the flu.
  11. Qweevox

    Some Sound advice from Darrell Holland

    I'm not trying to minimize the risk of this. Quite the contrary, I'm very concerned because of normalcy bias, and most people's failure to take appropriate personal action to limit exposure and spread. I also don't trust the CCP's numbers. In my experience, they've always massaged their numbers or outright lie about them. I don't trust anything the CCP says. Working in the financial sector I've seen them do this for almost 30 years. So you'll get no argument from me regarding the Chinese Communist Party. China is the W.H.O.'s second-largest financial supporter right behind the US, and yet China wouldn't let the W.H.O. send in medical teams to assess the risk. Instead, The World Health Organization just parrotted the numbers the CCP gave them. If this thing has an R0 of 2-3 it's right in the sweet spot for spread. At most, the flu has an R0 of 1.3. However, I do think kids and young people are stealth spreaders. That's based on the statistics released by the CDC and my own state's health department which shows only 2% of the confirmed cases have been kids under 18. Young adults between the ages of 18-30 only make up about 8% of the confirmed cases. Those are "confirmed cases" where they were confirmed because the kids and young adults were showing symptoms. The theory is many more kids and young people are probably infected carriers and are not showing symptoms, or at least not serious enough symptoms to get tested. We've closed all our schools and universities, which I think is an appropriate action at this point. With that said, some young adults have had serious complications including massive and permanent lung tissue damage. So I don't think kids and young adults are completely immune to this virus, or at least all of them aren't. Personally, I think the spread is on orders of magnitude greater than what is reflected in the numbers. I believe we'll see these numbers spike over the next 30-90 days.
  12. Qweevox

    Some Sound advice from Darrell Holland

    But I agree we shouldn't panic.
  13. Qweevox

    Some Sound advice from Darrell Holland

    No, Coronavirus Isn't 'Just Like The Flu'. Here Are The Very Important Differences AFP 14 MARCH 2020 Aches and pains, sore throat, fever – although they may feel similar to those suffering from their symptoms, the novel coronavirus is not the same as the seasonal flu, experts stressed Wednesday. COVID-19, the illness caused by coronavirus, proves deadly in around 3.5 percent of confirmed cases. While this is not the same as its mortality rate, given many people may be infected but not realise it, it is significantly higher than seasonal flu, which typically kills 0.1 percent of patients. "There is still considerable uncertainty around the fatality rates of COVID-19 and it likely varies depending on the quality of local healthcare," said Francois Balloux, Professor of Computational Systems Biology at University College London. "That said, it is around two percent on average, which is about 20 times higher than for the seasonal flu lineages currently in circulation." Serious cases But the true danger of coronavirus is unlikely to be the death toll. Experts say health systems could easily become overwhelmed by the number of cases requiring hospitalisation – and, often ventilation to support breathing. An analysis of 45,000 confirmed cases in China, where the epidemic originated, show that the vast majority of deaths were among the elderly (14.8 percent mortality among over 80s). But another Chinese study showed that 41 percent of serious cases occurred among under 50s, compared with 27 percent among over 65s. "It's true that if you're older you're at greater risk, but serious cases can also happen in relatively young people with no prior conditions," said French deputy health minister Jerome Salomon. Contagiousness Disease experts estimate that each COVID-19 sufferer infects between two to 3 others. That's a reproduction rate up to twice as high as seasonal flu, which typically infects 1.3 new people for each patient. Vaccine/treatment Salomon said that humans have lived with influenza for more than 100 years. "We've studied it closely," he said. "This new virus resembles the flu in terms of physical symptoms but there are huge differences." Number one is the lack of a vaccine against COVID-19, or even any treatment shown to be consistently effective. While some trials have shown promise delivering anti-retroviral drugs to serious cases, as well as some experimental therapies, their sample sizes are too small to roll out to the general population. Hundreds of researchers around the world are working frantically to find a COVID-19 vaccine, but the development process takes months and is likely too late for the current outbreak. Even if a vaccine magically appeared, getting everyone access it to it is no small order. Health authorities regularly complain that not enough people receive the flu vaccine to guarantee "herd immunity". https://www.sciencealert.com/the-new-coronavirus-isn-t-like-the-flu-but-they-have-one-big-thing-in-common
  14. Qweevox

    Where do we stand: Covid-19

    Coronavirus is a new novel virus, and it's here to stay. Covid-19 is the strain that originated in 2019. We'll have a covid-20, covid-21, covid-21 A and B strain, and so on. Hopefully, in 12 to 18 months we'll have a covid vaccine that people will have to take like the seasonal flu vaccine. This particular virus doesn't affect young people. Fewer than 2% of reported cases have been kids 18 or younger. Only 8% of 20 somethings show symptoms. SO young people are the perfect vector for transmission. This virus, unlike the flu, can survive on surfaces for days, it can be spread over large areas from aerosol transmission (people sneezing or coughing). It kills old people pretty efficiently. Mortality rates for senior citizens who contract the disease are experiencing a mortality rate of around 18-20%. So, for them, it's like a spin of the cylinder in a game of Russian roulette. Their asymptomatic grandkids can give them this gift. The virus has an R0 of 2-2.5, but I actually think it's much higher since a large percentage of the population (kids and young adults) have few or no symptoms from the virus. To put that in perspective seasonal flu has an R0 of .1 or so. So this virus moves. Even if it has an R0 of 2 most of us will be exposed to it over the next couple of months. It can come to you from your kids, it can be picked up on shopping containers or delivered to your home in through the mail. We were overdue for an economic recession, so here it is. Central banks around the world are pumping QE into the system. But like morphine we've been on a constant drip since '08, after 12 years there's just not a lot it can do to ease the economic pain. Keynesian economics doesn't work. We need healthy and natural economic depressions instead of plastering over the cracks in the dike with government money. I love economic history. Once upon a time, we called all economic downturns "depressions" and we had them with great regularity. Then around the middle of the 20th century, we decided to start calling them "recessions" because it sounded better. The simple truth is depressions are good. Money and capital change hands, and the concentration in wealth are shaken up. All modern monatary policy does today is keep the wealthy rich, keep broken institutions and corporations in operation, and the economy unhealthy. It will eventually all come crashing down. Do I think that's Covid-19 ....one can hope. But I don't think so.
×