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mpireone68

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    Wills Point,TX
  1. mpireone68

    got a mildot scope?

    No, of course I won't give up that easy. I'm one of those people who, out of frustration, will keep doing something until I eventually get it. I'll just keep practicing! Thanks for all the help!
  2. mpireone68

    got a mildot scope?

    When ever you get the chance.
  3. mpireone68

    got a mildot scope?

    Thanks for the help! Check out the last paragraph in the recent reply to Colt45 about the "object test" ,and see if I'm really that off? I hope we're all off target because I don't want to be the only retard here! LOL
  4. mpireone68

    got a mildot scope?

    Well, I'd better not ask anymore Q's about your where-abouts, don't want you to get into trouble. Yes, it's a P3-Illuminated. You can see what I see by clicking here, http://www.schmidtbender.com/reticlesPM.htm But as far as calibration, I don't know because my scope came without a manual for some reason. I'll probably just have to call S&B. But as far as ranging calculations, the window's calculations came out roughly to about the right distance. But as far as the A/C unit, I can't see it being no more than 2ft. wide, even if it is a large unit. When I have the power cranked up, it's hard to get a bad reading because the unit is so squared and the MIL's are huge, giving you a more exact reading. I even tried calculations, giving and taking a couple of inches and giving and taking a 1/4 to a 1/8 of a mil(.75,.65,etc.), and the calculations are still pretty hay-wire. And I just thought of something, the average width of a person is about 22-24 inches wide. And in most situations, snipers calculate their estimations using a person upper torso as reference? So how the heck is the numbers not adding up? I don't know, maybe you could try a test similar to what I did with your scope, picking two objects of different sizes at the same distance and try to see if they range at the same distance? If your calculations comes out then I'll just get a simple crosshair scope and a range-finder and call it quits with the mil dots. LOL
  5. mpireone68

    got a mildot scope?

    I had already visited that shooterready website and got my calculations from there. There's another great site also (http://www.mil-dot.com/Mil_Dot_User_Guide.htm#Math) I replied back to RACER because at the time you were offline, so you can read my reply from him and give feed back. RACER mentioned that you're deployed? Where at? Thanks for the equipment KUDOS!
  6. mpireone68

    got a mildot scope?

    Colt45 replied back but he's offline right. But part of his reply said, "Hey Mp--most of what Racer said is pretty much correct. First thing to do is find out what magnification setting your scope is calibrated to range at. Most manufacturers set their stuff up at either 10x or max magnification.....no idea about yours. (look at the adjustment ring--one of the numbers should have a ring around it--that's your ranging setting) The other thing to find out is how your reticle is calibrated. Some manufacturers don't use standard 1 mil increments on the windage--no idea about yours. See if the dots are equally spaced from the center.....my Nightforce NPR2 ret was in 2 and 5 mil increments on windage. It made for quicker guesstimations and a less cluttered image, but it kinda sucked for precision." I checked my scope and there's no indications or markings saying what power it needs to be at for ranging. The thing is, I think maybe, for this particular scope, it may not matter because when I ZOOM, the RETICLE and the object ZOOM's together, so the MIL DOT stays at the same increments with the object, the same increments as it would be at it's lowest power? As far as the MIL DOT increments on the reticle, it looks pretty standard with a floating center crosshair, four ROUND MIL DOTs with the heavy post at the ends. Nothing fancy. And for ranging I used the "Mil Dot Method" read from a website (http://www.mil-dot.com/Mil_Dot_User_Guide.htm#Math)
  7. mpireone68

    got a mildot scope?

    I also forgot to ask, once you have your yards estimate, how do you use the Mil Dot to hold it at that specific range? For example, minus the wind and temperature factor, if my scope is zeroed in at a 100 yards, which Mil Dot would I hold it at to hit a target 630 yards away?
  8. mpireone68

    got a mildot scope?

    You sound like you know what you're doing, so tell me what I'm doing wrong. I measured a distance to a shed using Google Earth and it came to about 450 yards, give or take a couple of feet or yards, being that it isn't the most accurate tool to use but at least it's in the ballpark range. I have a S&B 5-25x56 scope mounted on a AI 300 Win. Mag., I put the scope at full power(x25) to get a more accurate MIL reading, and measured two things from the shed, a window approx. 30 inches wide coming out to 1.75 Mils and a A/C wall unit about 20 inches wide, .75 Mils. And I came out with these calculations - (window) 30in. x 27.77 = 833 divided by 1.75 = 476 (A/C unit) 20in. x 27.77 = 555 divided by .75 = 740 The A/C unit is directly next to the window, now if the A/C unit was the only object to get a range estimation from, I'd be over 260 yards off. But yet the window gave a better rough range estimate? What if you needed to take out that A/C unit and came up with those calculations, you'd be off by a mile! I know the Mil Dot formula gives just an estimated range and isn't accurate down to a dime so how do you compensate between those measurements that I gave?
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