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Getting into Reloading

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So I have been thinking about getting into reloading for a while but did not know where to start. Last week my dad asked me if I wanted to go in on a Dillon XL650. I am just wondering if this is a good reloader for a beginner and if anyone has any experience with the Dillon XL650. I am guessing that Dillon is a top notch brand when it comes to reloading, right? We would be using it for .223, .45 and maybe a few others. I don't know a lot about reloading yet but I want to learn as much as I can from the armory and reloading books.

 

Anyway, here is a link to the one that we are looking at. http://www.ebay.com/itm/223-Dillon-XL650-machine-3pcs-CARBIDE-die-set-Strong-Mount-Roller-Hand-/261191893306?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3cd040013a

 

Any thoughts/advice is greatly appreciated.

Thanks

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650 is nice, but if I were to start out I'd get the 550. You need to learn how to load before you manufacture, and the 550 can run single stage

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I would go 550.

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For once I go with the herd..........550 is the way to fly. :D: You will hear all about single stage presss but you can run the 550 as a single stage until you get the hang of it.

 

But FIRST get the Lyman #49 and read it before even thinking about getting that puppy out of the box. Get the book now and order the press. The way things are going you will have time to read it twice before it shows up. Your local gun shop should have it or AMAZON. Also buy the ABC's of Reloading. The one NOT written by LEE.

 

This place will get you hooked up for bumps in the road. Lots of talent here that gets passed around. I learn something on here all the time and try to help if I can occasionally.

 

Greg

Edited by GLShooter

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"try to help occasionally if I can"...... That's an understatement.

 

Don't mean to sound like an ass-kiss here, but these guys are 'gold' for the beginner as well as the seasoned veteran. I wish I lived closer to Arizona so I could just go sit and listen and watch some of the stuff (Greg) and the group cook up.

 

When I was in high school, there was a guy in Lancaster, Missouri that had a gun shop in his basement. It was incredible. He had tons of stuff, a couple of old couches and an old wood burning stove in one corner. Some buddies of mine and I would go there on the weekends and just browse and listen to the 'old timers' talk about guns, hunting and hand loading. If you just sat there with your mouth shut and listened, you could learn so much.


This forum reminds me of that. Keep reading and jump in.

 

O.K., I just passed my Bud Select limit for posting on the internet......put new plugs in the wife's Toyota minivan tonight and the pain in my lower back is starting to subside...

 

Winkel

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Another vote here for the walk before you run method of reloading. Being able to run that 550 as a single stage in the beginning will give you a better understanding of exactly what happens at each step, without throwing any surprises that can't be dealt with right then and there. Once you have it down, then set it up to run as a progressive but do so slowly until you're 100% confident in your new hobby.

 

I loaded thousands of rounds on a single stage before I ever upgraded to an auto indexing turret press. One of these days I'm going to talk myself into a progressive so I can keep up with my trigger finger :snicker:

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That is the bueaty of the 550 for sure. The manual index shell plate slows things down so a guy can LOOK at the cases and check for powder and bullet seating. He also can keep up with primer and powder levels a bit easier.

 

Greg

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Thanks for the advice. I think that you guys are right. I don't know very much about reloading at all so I am going to hold off on getting anything until I learn more. I am looking at reloading books on Amazon right now. I am looking at the ABC's of reloading and it seems to have some bad reviews on amazon. They say that it is outdated and doesn't have much recent info. They say it is more about the history of reloading. Is this something that I should still get or should I look for a different book? The one I am looking at is written by Dr. C. Rodney James.

 

I will also be getting the Lyman 49th edition reloading handbook. Any other books that you would recommend for a beginner?

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Get the manuals that your gonna be buying bullets for..

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Read your PM. From Dillon it lists for $550.

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Thanks for the advice. I think that you guys are right. I don't know very much about reloading at all so I am going to hold off on getting anything until I learn more. I am looking at reloading books on Amazon right now. I am looking at the ABC's of reloading and it seems to have some bad reviews on amazon. They say that it is outdated and doesn't have much recent info. They say it is more about the history of reloading. Is this something that I should still get or should I look for a different book? The one I am looking at is written by Dr. C. Rodney James.

 

I will also be getting the Lyman 49th edition reloading handbook. Any other books that you would recommend for a beginner?

 

My opinion on the ABC book is that while some of it is theoretically out dated the principals are sound. We can build prettier presses but at the end of the day they all do the same thing. There are newer specialty dies out there like the Lee Factory Crimp and we have some new case prep stations that are motor driven but the results are the same. The hardcore bare knucle activity of reloading is to be found in that particular book IMHO. Of course I freely admit I was loading when much of it was brand new but mixing Old School in with the current stuff is pretty seamless when you look at what the process is and what will enhance the speed, quality and quantity of your loading out put.

 

Other books I would buy would be the Hornady manual and the Sierra book. That will cover about 80% of the bullets you will shoot in conjunction with the Lyman offering.

Greg

 

PS: I'm TRYING to help here!!

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My opinion on the ABC book is that while some of it is theoretically out dated the principals are sound. We can build prettier presses but at the end of the day they all do the same thing. There are newer specialty dies out there like the Lee Factory Crimp and we have some new case prep stations that are motor driven but the results are the same. The hardcore bare knucle activity of reloading is to be found in that particular book IMHO. Of course I freely admit I was loading when much of it was brand new but mixing Old School in with the current stuff is pretty seamless when you look at what the process is and what will enhance the speed, quality and quantity of your loading out put.

 

Other books I would buy would be the Hornady manual and the Sierra book. That will cover about 80% of the bullets you will shoot in conjunction with the Lyman offering.

Greg

 

PS: I'm TRYING to help here!!

Thanks. You are helping a lot. I will look into the Hornady manual and the sierra book as well. I think that I will get the ABC's of reloading and the Lyman to begin with. Those should help me get started.

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Read your PM. From Dillon it lists for $550.

Thanks. I don't think that I will be ordering one until I get a few books and learn more about it.

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Order it now. You'll have read all the books at least once before it arrives :laugh:

 

Greg and many of these other guys are smart cookies when it comes to reloading and precision shooting. Lots of knowledge here. Use it to your advantage. :wink:

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I still suggest buying a used single stage from someone on Ebay or wherever you can get one at a deep discount. having one is a valuable tool when you run into issues or you run a universal depriming die off press, or an RCBS crimp remover or a ram priming unit.

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