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Tyr

judges to order guns temporarily seized

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Connecticut's law allows judges to order guns temporarily seized after police present "evidence" that a person is a danger to themselves or others.

 

This was as it says on my Yahoo news page, posted 3 hours ago?

Is this correct? Can someone in Connecticut get PO'ed at one of you, call a cop telling them you are a nut.

(Next) Officers get's a warrant stating probable cause of; they have been told this person (You) are a nut!

(Next) Knock on the door, wham-bam two officers of the law show up and your guns are gone for as long as a year.

I know the state of Connecticut is understandably shook up after the school shooting. But has no one stood up for the Constitution?

This law is 15 years old, what kind of probable cause can a law enforcement officer come up with?

In the report this year; law enforcement has doubled their use of this law?

 

Just a question?

 

Jake

Edited by Tyr

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I know a guy that happened to in Florida. No court order- the police just took them for his own "protection." It took a while to get them all back.

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Connecticut's law allows judges to order guns temporarily seized after police present "evidence" that a person is a danger to themselves or others.

 

This was as it says on my Yahoo news page, posted 3 hours ago?

Is this correct? Can someone in Connecticut get PO'ed at one of you, call a cop telling them you are a nut.

(Next) Officers get's a warrant stating probable cause of; they have been told this person (You) are a nut!

(Next) Knock on the door, wham-bam two officers of the law show up and your guns are gone for as long as a year.

I know the state of Connecticut is understandably shook up after the school shooting. But has no one stood up for the Constitution?

This law is 15 years old, what kind of probable cause can a law enforcement officer come up with?

In the report this year; law enforcement has doubled their use of this law?

 

Just a question?

 

Jake

It usually involves some kind of involuntary civil commitment for a short period of time for observation.

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I know a guy that happened to in Florida. No court order- the police just took them for his own "protection." It took a while to get them all back.

The department get sued? We are allowed to remove firearms from certain individuals. However, if a non-prohibited person wishes to retrieve them with the permission of the owner, we have to release them. As in immediately, as soon as we can get our property tech into the office to make it so.

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