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calebj06

How to become a better shooter?

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So I have been shooting more in the last 2 years than ever before in my life. I know I have good quality equipment but my ammo was lacking.

 

So, I started reloading. So now I know I have good quality ammo.

 

Here's the problem. I don't have a good quality foundation of how to be a good shooter and longer distances.

 

Shooting today at 100 yards I could make 2 rounds almost go in the same hole, then # 3 would be an inch off. FRUSTRATING.

 

So I would like to know. What tips can anyone give me that will help me to become more consistent??

 

I felt all uncomfortable at my ranges tables so I bought a portable shooting bench and I feel much better now. I still however am having a hard time being consistent.

 

I have picked up little things like from newbe's magpul class they taught him to move his thumb out from behind the grip.

 

I feel that with just a little help and tips on how to position myself and what not I could improve a lot.

 

What tips can you all give me?

 

Also. Are there things that helped you become a better shooter? Maybe shooting at objects instead of paper??

 

 

Thanks.

Caleb.

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I know its costly, but the best way to become a better shooter is to get some professional instruction.

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Attend training. It's the best way.

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Relax. I find that when I get too concerned with my performance instead of just shooting and minding the fundamentals I pull shots, or push into the rifle anticipating the shots and so on.

 

The less you focus, sometimes, the more you can simply do. If that makes sense?

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This....but it takes serious research into finding instructors that can not only teach, but have the knowledge to impart and can hep you vs taking your money and putting lots of smoke in the air and burning up your money....

 

 

 

 

I know its costly, but the best way to become a better shooter is to get some professional instruction.

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Relax. I find that when I get too concerned with my performance instead of just shooting and minding the fundamentals I pull shots, or push into the rifle anticipating the shots and so on.

 

The less you focus, sometimes, the more you can simply do. If that makes sense?

This is along the lines I was going to recommend.

 

If the shot isn't right, stop...get your breathing back in order, take your eye out of the sight, look around and focus near, far, middle, find some colors for your eyes to "relax" a bit.

 

On reload drills, take an extra second, or two, get your natural point of aim back. Unless the amount of time, that you use, is part of the competition, use all the time they give you. Get through your mental checklist and start your trigger press - or whatever they're calling it these days.

 

This is assuming you have time to do all of what I just wrote.

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I'll kick in more tomorrow but in an earlier time I would think 22 RF and a good airgun. That's given your interest is shooting not door kicking. I've taught some of each. ...nothing is easy in gear or time investment.

 

Greg

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I'm thinking that breaking out the 10/22 and a big scope will help. Just for the fact that I can run through 100's of round and it not really matter.

Edited by calebj06

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I second Greg's advise on this. An air rifle is good for working on fundamentals. Especially a piston driven air rifle, as they tend to be more unforgiving and the results on target will readily show flaws (or inconsistancies) in three areas. Shooting position (eg... preload into a bipod), trigger control, and follow through. piston driven air rifles can be a good, inexpensive training tool. But be sure to get a scope rated for air rifle use, because the recoil impulse from the piston firing is in the opposite direction from a regular firearm. It can ruin a normal scope.

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Im gonna chime in here and say do as much research as you can if you cannot afford the training. When I first started shooting I did research and payed a lot of attention to travis haley and what he has to say. He knows his shat and is kind of a role model for me. As long as you practice the RIGHT fundementals, start out slow dont expect speed first but accuracy should come first. speed will come later, you should be able to self teach yourself A LOT as long as you do it right. Remember, no one cares how fast you can miss. It took me a long time but I am pretty fast now and can hold 10 rounds as fast as i can pull the trigger at 15 yards in about a 3-4 inch group. Lots of practice though as in like 2000 rounds or so a month. Reload or buy ammo by the bulk. You will get there.

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I guess those RIGHT fundamentals is what I'm asking about. Just so that I know what to focus on.

 

Btw: I'm talking bench rest precision shooting. Not tactical. That will come later.

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I'll dig up some bench technique stuff for you tomorrow. As usual it costs money for reference material. You gotta learn somewhere. Rocking and rolling at full speed is one thing. Surgical work is never fast to start. Dimes and coffee cups are two different targets.

 

Greg

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I guess those RIGHT fundamentals is what I'm asking about. Just so that I know what to focus on.

 

Btw: I'm talking bench rest precision shooting. Not tactical. That will come later.

 

If you would like I am willing to do a video exclusivly for you starting you out with the basics. I love helping people. I will start you from the beginning and we can take it as far as you want buddy. If you wanna start long range first I think that is a good idea. we will get your trigger control and breating techniques down first then go from there. if you are interested send me an email at bravocompanymfg@gmail.com we can swap phone numbers so we can talk in private if thats ok with you, or how ever you want. I am here to help anyone I can in passing my knowlege down to new comers. I dont know eveything but I know a lot and have mucho experience. Remember pros dont practice until they get it right, they practice until they get it wrong, meaning always pushing their failure points but that will come in the tactical part of your training. let me know. (i am in no way affiliated with them just love their company so that is why i chose that email.)

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Also as we start out with your long range trainging we will be shooting for groups. but come tactical time its all about combat effective hits. if you hit an enemy soldier or home intruder trying to hurt your family and you hit him in the arm hes going to have to change the way he does things if you know what i mean. and i dont like to practice to many double taps or teach it rather. sometimes a double tap may not eliminate the threat so i teach multiple rounds on target at least 4 or 5 or until the threat is eliminated.

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Some good advice here, but what I did not see is

don't forget to have fun!

 

Having said that, practice does not make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect.

 

If you still need help with the basics, get the training.

 

If your fundamentals are solid

 

Don't be afraid to experiment within those fundamentals. What works for one may not work for another.

 

Find your optimum comfort zone and go from there.

 

Another thing that came to mind is that if you are after those tiny groups and are close, differences in your reloads may be larger than differences in your shots.

 

In any event, good luck and enjoy !

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