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newbe

Deburring the Flash Hole (How to with instructions)

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As re-loaders, many of us not only want to make better than factory ammo, we also want to make it as good as possible in order to be able to shoot tight groups and less spread between shots at extended range. One step in this process is de-burring the flash hole.

 

When brass is made, the flash hole is often "punched out". This will often times leave a burr on the inside of the hole that can negatively affect the burn of the powder, thereby reducing the efficiency and consistency of the burn. There are tools made specifically for removing this burr. This is the one I have and use, and though a simple tool, it does a great job of the task.

 

https://www.kmshooting.com/catalog/flash-hole-uniformer-tools/flash-hole-uniformer_professional-ppc_0062.html

 

It comes with a set of directions and does a great job.

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Some close ups of the tool itself.

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The "business" end.

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This is the part that centers the tool at the case neck. Helps to insure everything is straight and aligned.

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Preparing to insert the tool and get rid of that nasty burr!

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Centering the tool.

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You can see the cutting end of the tool sticking out a bit from the front of the flash hole.

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Holding the case and centering the tool with one hand while turning the tool/removing the burr with the other hand.

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After de-burring 100 cases. I turn the case upside down and tap it on a paper towel to capture the metal shavings and get them out of the case.

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A closer look..

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After tapping the cases to get the metal shavings out, I go one more step to make sure there are no metal shavings left in the cases.

I grab a can of compressed air (can be found almost anywhere, usually used for blowing off keyboards, etc), and proceed to hit each one with a short blast of air.

Be sure to wear safety glasses, and keep the mouth of the case facing in another direction as you DO NOT want to get these shavings in your eye!

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And Wallah!! Clean and ready to be primed!

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Hopefully this simple tutorial helps answer any questions you might have about this operation. :thumb:

Edited by newbe
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Wouldn't you also need to deburr the primer pocket of military round fired brass? The primers are crimped, aren't they?

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Wouldn't you also need to deburr the primer pocket of military round fired brass? The primers are crimped, aren't they?

Yes Joel, you would need to remove the "crimp". This does not address removing crimped primers, only de-burring the flash holes from the inside. :thumb:

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Yes Joel, you would need to remove the "crimp". This does not address removing crimped primers, only de-burring the flash holes from the inside. :thumb:

My mistake. Just getting my stuff together to start reloading.

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Good illustration. Probably the one best thing you can do to make brass work at top performance.

 

Now put some power to it like a professional and save your fingers. :segrin: A tumbler is my answer to handling those little pieces. Additionally you could up the ante and buy the Lapua that is drilled not punched. I follow it up with pocket uniforming and if need be as noted above the crimp removal. With enough work you can turn Winchester into Lapua but after a few hundred how many do we really need? I figure 100-200 per gun holds me well.

 

Greg

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So would the Profession Standard 0.080 be the tool for .223/5.56? What about .308?

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I use a Lee case holder that chucks into your drill for this operation.

 

Chuck it, ream it, tap it out, hit it with compressed air.

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So would the Profession Standard 0.080 be the tool for .223/5.56? What about .308?

Sorry I didn't respond sooner. According to their website:

 

Features:

1. Reams / deburrs / chamfers

2. Provides case centering / alignment

3. Uniforms to pre-set, controlled depth (Independent of case length)

4. Screw-on, replaceable, cutter

5. Hex knob won't roll

6. One tool fits all standard rifle and pistol calibers

7. Made of steel and brass; no aluminum or plastic

8. Tool also available for P.P.C./ B.R. calibers please specify

 

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That's the one you want. If you go with Lapua PPC/BR brass you need the other one. They use smaller flash holes and you have to use special deprimeing pins with them.

 

Greg

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Most primer flash holes are 0.062 or 0.080 I believe that's a 1/16 and a # 46 wire drill respectively if memory serves ...

 

I know a fellow who makes em all the same size W/ a # 46 , says it's never hindered performance and he ought too know being a bench blaster in unlimited class ...

Edited by BushXM15

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Most primer flash holes are 0.062 or 0.080 I believe that's a 1/16 and a # 46 wire drill respectively if memory serves ...

 

I know a fellow who makes em all the same size W/ a # 46 , says it's never hindered performance and he ought too know being a bench blaster in unlimited class ...

I'm not sure why you would want to drill your flash holes. That is one of the keys as to why the PPC and the BR cartridges shoot the way they do. They have a name in the benchrest community for people who drill flash holes: LOOSER

 

And by the way, You lost your credibility with the comment about your friend, the benchrest shooter when you said he was IN UNLIMITED class. In Benchrest there are no classes. Unlimited is the class of gun. That means the class with no weight restrictions. Anything over 131/2 pounds is unlimited. This is the class where the Rail Guns are shot.

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I'm not sure why you would want to drill your flash holes. That is one of the keys as to why the PPC and the BR cartridges shoot the way they do. They have a name in the benchrest community for people who drill flash holes: LOOSER

 

Why wouldn't you want to? Does it create some other variance?

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I'm not sure why you would want to drill your flash holes. That is one of the keys as to why the PPC and the BR cartridges shoot the way they do. They have a name in the benchrest community for people who drill flash holes: LOOSER

 

And by the way, You lost your credibility with the comment about your friend, the benchrest shooter when you said he was IN UNLIMITED class. In Benchrest there are no classes. Unlimited is the class of gun. That means the class with no weight restrictions. Anything over 131/2 pounds is unlimited. This is the class where the Rail Guns are shot.

 

Is it not still unlimited class ? as You yourself just stated , any rail gun over 13.5 lb is unlimited !. An MY credibility was never in question as I don't shoot BR Class period !!!... .

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