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Bearz63401

Simple question on .223 vs 5.56

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Ok my ar has a BCM 16' upper 5.56. Benefits of using

.223, 55gr

.223, 62gr

5.56 ? grain

 

 

 

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Most of the ammo you are going to find in 62 grain will be 556. 55 grain is about 50/50. Odd weights like 64, 50, and stuff like that will normally be in 223.

 

As far as I know, 556 (NATO SPEC) is only available in 55, 62, and 77 grain.

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IF the upper says 5.56 then it will shoot any of the NATO rounds, most common, 55 grain and 62 grain. The main concern difference difference is not the caliber number. They're both a .22 caliber, that's the bullet diameter. The concern is the brass and how it fits into a guns chamber. The 5.56mm NATO rounds are allowed to be a bit longer on the neck. Though rare, if the neck bottoms out, it can cause a pressure spike of over an additional 10,000 psi which can cause some guns to well explode.

 

The number on the upper then is the chambered for designation.

 

.223 being shorter on the neck brass can shoot with no problems in a 5.56mm chamber.

 

Now things are never easy, There's one exception to the rule of "Don't shoot 5.56mm in a .223 chamber". Many guns if not most have a Wylde chamber which is a modified chamber to allow them to safely shoot 5.56mm. This is usualy designated in your instruction manual and if not, best to look it up or call the manufacturer worse case take to a gunsmith and see if he can measure.

 

Now this being said, most 5.56mm ammunition does not have the long necked brass that's allowed on their prints. I have seen more than one batch of European NATO ammunition that did so it is a distinct possibility.

 

5.56 mm stamped on the upper, you are good to go.

 

Tj

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I'm not sure what you're asking. A 5.56 upper can handle both, as they are for all intents and purposes the same thing, with the 5.56 being loaded slightly hotter. If you're asking which one performs better, that's dependent on what you're wanting, and mostly depends on the specific round in question. As for bullet weight, I'm betting you have a 1:7 twist barrel, so for the best accuracy you'll want to stick to 62gr. and heavier. But, like anything else, there are exceptions to that. What are you wanting the ammunition for specifically? Plinking, home defense, competition?

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Yes my barrel is stamped 5.56. Mainly be shooting non competition target and plinking. Your replies so far have been very helpful and I appreciate it.

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In other words, you are good to go!!! Shoot 5.56 or .223. HAVE FUN!

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In other words, you are good to go!!! Shoot 5.56 or .223. HAVE FUN

 

Now to find the best deal out there on 5.56 or .223 62gr

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Yes my barrel is stamped 5.56. Mainly be shooting non competition target and plinking. Your replies so far have been very helpful and I appreciate it.

 

I think 55 grain is the cheapest right now. The last I checked, 62 grain was still going higher because of that whole ATF thing. Also be aware that most 62 grain has a steel penetrator, meaning you can't shoot it in any indoor range.

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The BCM will shoot anything from 50gr up to 77gr without issue.

 

Find some cheap brass cased .223 or 5.56 and get to shooting with it!!

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Your 5.56 NATO chamber will be safe to use with any 5.56/.223 ammo on the market. It's designed for mil-spec 5.56 ammo, which is typically loaded hotter than civilian ammo. That said, you might have trouble with the bottom-of-the-barrel .223 stuff (like the steel-case Wolf and Tula stuff). That stuff is loaded very weak, and you could have problems with short-stroke / FTF / FTE. I'd avoid that stuff anyway, because the powder they use produces excessive soot. And that can literally gum up the works. Ask me how I know this... :hmm:

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I have some Armscor .223 62gr, 3050fps to try out and some Federal .223,55gr. So far I have shot perfecta .223,55gr with no issues. Going to buy some 5.56 ,62gr next

Edited by Bearz63401

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Good info for a newbie like me! Thanks.

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