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Newbe's Epic Small Rifle Primer test (A test of 9 different primers)

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The MS set up is so convenient but the old school set up saves components IMHO. I just couldn't trust the results with anything on the barrel heavier than a postage stamp. The LabRadar deal would be the ideal combination of the best attributes of both.

 

I shoot 95% of my bullets through a chronograph. I haven't worked up a load first and then checked the speed for well over 35 years. Back then I didn't even check the speed. I just took the books word for it and went with it. In the 80's chronographs were still scarce. I still have my original Oehler that you turn the knob on and convert the base 8 results to decimal speeds.

 

Greg

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I shoot for groups every time I pull the trigger :wink:

 

I don't have the MS attached when I am working up a load.

 

I test for accuracy nodes with 3-4 shot groups, then verify with 5-shot groups. Once I have a proven accurate load, I attach the MS and get the speeds, then make my drop charts.

 

The only time the MS comes out is after I've proven the load.

 

Hopefully this answers your question.

That's exactly what i was thinking. I doubt i will get gold or silver medal groups....more levels like aluminum or pot metal medal groups with the YHM barrel on my AR.

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Old fashioned harmonics. It would not necessarily produce the same changes with a different bullet, powder or charge weight.

 

Greg

 

 

not to hijack the thread did you ever finish that book yet?

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not to hijack the thread did you ever finish that book yet?

Not yet. Now I am at the fancy trick stuff and load data.

 

When it gets published the Forum here will know it first. I'm trying to figure out how many copies. Maybe 200 for a start.

 

Greg

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When it gets published the Forum here will know it first. I'm trying to figure out how many copies. Maybe 200 for a start.

 

Greg

You can do preorders. I'm in for one !

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Thanks for posting newbie !. I personally I have found overall Federal match primers superior for accuracy ( Not velocity ) with nearly every caliber and load .

 

Some exceptions being magnums where mag primers are essential for proper ignition .Powder changes a lot of the parameters brand lot etc. .

 

You are correct all bets are off the table when powder cases or bullet ( design or weight ) are changed ,as ES and SD become hectically intertwined in complexity !...

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Awesome test! Thanks for the data.

 

I always knew that the Federal SR gold-match was 1 of my go-to for my "pet" loads. I expected the Remington 7 1/2 to perform better!??? Maybe the harmonic variance caused by the different primers could be tweaked by adjusting the powder charge to fall within the accuracy node. The test with the MS attached (using the 7 1/2)showed promise, if you could just find that node without it attached it looks to be a winner, too.

 

I saw some other type of testing where the "ignition" of various primers was solely tested and the Remington 7 1/2 BR showed that it threw the most consistent and further reaching ignition heat/charge vs other primers. The thought was that it threw more ignition particles/heat farther into the case, therefore possible greater chances of complete combustion within the cartridge???

 

Ahhh, the joys of reloading...the possibilities are endless! :laugh:

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Awesome test! Thanks for the data.

 

I always knew that the Federal SR gold-match was 1 of my go-to for my "pet" loads. I expected the Remington 7 1/2 to perform better!??? Maybe the harmonic variance caused by the different primers could be tweaked by adjusting the powder charge to fall within the accuracy node. The test with the MS attached (using the 7 1/2)showed promise, if you could just find that node without it attached it looks to be a winner, too.

 

I saw some other type of testing where the "ignition" of various primers was solely tested and the Remington 7 1/2 BR showed that it threw the most consistent and further reaching ignition heat/charge vs other primers. The thought was that it threw more ignition particles/heat farther into the case, therefore possible greater chances of complete combustion within the cartridge???

 

Ahhh, the joys of reloading...the possibilities are endless! :laugh:

I believe your theories are more than likely true. And yes, I was pretty surprised by the results as well except for the Wolf SR primers. They seem to consistently have low ES and SD.

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When I moved to utah I had to put my reloading stuff into a storage shelter. I noticed a tiny amount on rust on the dial of my neck turning mandrel. I was wondering if this level of humidity would cause any change to my primer supply. Ive never had any problems with humidity before so it was never a factor. I have all my stuff in a dry book case now thankfully.

 

Also how important is using a primer pocket uniforming tool? Ive never done it. I guess Ill order the one that goes on the drill and just zap all of them to make sure. Ive never dealt with any brass that had a staked or crimped primer.

Maybe this will enspire me to do my own primer comparison. So you take your pet load and try different primers basically?

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When I moved to utah I had to put my reloading stuff into a storage shelter. I noticed a tiny amount on rust on the dial of my neck turning mandrel. I was wondering if this level of humidity would cause any change to my primer supply. Ive never had any problems with humidity before so it was never a factor. I have all my stuff in a dry book case now thankfully.

 

Also how important is using a primer pocket uniforming tool? Ive never done it. I guess Ill order the one that goes on the drill and just zap all of them to make sure. Ive never dealt with any brass that had a staked or crimped primer.

Maybe this will enspire me to do my own primer comparison. So you take your pet load and try different primers basically?

I store my primers inside. I'm sure short term they'll be fine. Long term, I'm not so sure.

 

In the book you just read (Reloading for Competition, Making the Target Bigger), Zediker states this as being an important step, especially after the cases have been fired. I've not done it on any of my virgin Hornady brass because the pocket was too tight for the uniforming tool to get down to the bottom without biding up. I'll see how they are after once fired.

 

I did the test just to see which primers would give the least variation in velocity (lowest ES and SD). Clearly you can see however that group size can be greatly affected as well.

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I shoot for groups every time I pull the trigger :wink:

 

I don't have the MS attached when I am working up a load.

 

I test for accuracy nodes with 3-4 shot groups, then verify with 5-shot groups. Once I have a proven accurate load, I attach the MS and get the speeds, then make my drop charts.

 

The only time the MS comes out is after I've proven the load.

 

Hopefully this answers your question.

 

Are accuracy nodes simply different intersections of superior accuracy when working up loads using the same bullet, case, primer, and powder,

 

but with differences in the other variables involved ?

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Are accuracy nodes simply different intersections of superior accuracy when working up loads using the same bullet, case, primer, and powder,

 

but with differences in the other variables involved ?

 

Essentially you are correct. The harmonics of the barrel come into play to a great extent. Hence the Browning BOSS tuner set up. The nodes can vary from barrel to barrel and from cartridge to cartridge. The 308 as an example with a 168 SMK will USUALLY shoot lights out down around 1900 FPS yet it also is outstanding in the 2600 area that is is shot in. Different powder charge but that might be the only change. Changing the COL, the prier and the powder independently can often move these nodes up and down. COL is a much bigger factor in some bullets/chambers than others.

 

It's a try and see problem for sure. It can be as scientific and regimented as you like or as haphazard as you choose. This is what separates case fillers/reloaders from the true handloaders.

 

Greg

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