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Historic Bombers in Pictures

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Great pics., thanks !

 

 

 

Matt

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Spectacular.

Thanks

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Very nice, thank you.

I do so enjoy seeing old planes. The fighters win the hearts but those big old flying bombers were the meat and potatoes of destruction. Watching the footage of a big bomber releasing pure hell on a enemy location is very exciting. Seeing bomb after bomb after bomb dropping from her holding area.

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My father flew a twin engine Hudson bomber as a US Navy CPO pilot. Yep, we had enlisted pilots. He flew the North Atlantic anti submarine routes during WWII. Dangerous missions, day after day, flying prop plane thousands of miles over freezing water. Ended war with a Presidential Unit Citation for valor, his was also the unit that sent the message “Sighted Sub, Sank Same.” His twin was a gunners mate, below him, on an armed freighter, it had deck guns mounted on each side and each end, we had them on some convoys, as a defense against surfaced U Boats. Their two brothers, one 3rd Army, Normandy, other 1st Marine Div, Iwo. They all returned home.

Ed

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5 minutes ago, Recondo 101 said:

My father flew a twin engine Hudson bomber as a US Navy CPO pilot. Yep, we had enlisted pilots. He flew the North Atlantic anti submarine routes during WWII. Dangerous missions, day after day, flying prop plane thousands of miles over freezing water. Ended war with a Presidential Unit Citation for valor, his was also the unit that sent the message “Sighted Sub, Sank Same.” His twin was a gunners mate, below him, on an armed freighter, it had deck guns mounted on each side and each end, we had them on some convoys, as a defense against surfaced U Boats. Their two brothers, one 3rd Army, Normandy, other 1st Marine Div, Iwo. They all returned home.

Ed

Nice story. Welcome to the forum!

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Yes, nice story.   :welcome: aboard.

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My great uncle Gerald Foster passed a few months ago at 99 years of age, bottom row 2nd from right. He was an officer and planes navigator.

His bomber was shot down somewhere over Germany and the big plane came down on some villagers farm land.

The crew survived the crash landing but I believe it was one of the machine gunners who was then unceremoniously killed, shot point blank by one of the farmers as the angry locals got to the downed plane just before the German soldiers arrived likely stopping them from killing the rest of the crew as well.

My uncle then spent a few years eating wormy bread in an officers POW camp someplace inside Germany before one day when they woke to find the camp had been deserted by their guards who had all left sometime in the night.

 

Listening to all the stories you could tell He never held any contempt or anger towards the farmers or the soldiers for their actions. He said it was just war and we were after all flying over dropping bombs on them.

 

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The carnage in the skies over Europe before the USA had long-range escort fighters and insisted on continuing with daylight bombing raids was, and is, nearly unbelievable. Kudos to the men like your grandfather! Jimmy Stewart was another one of the heroes.

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My Dad was an officer and navigator on both B-19 and B-25 bombers.  Their primary mission was to destroy the ball-bearing factories in and around Berlin.  They sat on their flak jackets because the pilots would fly "just above" the range of the anti-aircraft cannons and the bottoms of the aircraft would look live sieves when they returned to base.  He said it was unnerving to have flak come flying up through the bottom of the aircraft and bounce around inside.  While the pilots and crew rested between missions, the flight chiefs and maintenance people spent all their time patching holes in the belly and wings of the aircraft.  Dad said his flight chief complained that his crew was hell bent on achieving the record for most holes. :segrin: 
 

Dad died in 2011 at the age of 89.  Yup, those were the heroes of our time.

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Thank you for the kind comments. I did not mean to hijack the thread.

 

The bomber crews lived together and every day if they came back there were empty bunks and abandoned gear to live with. Day after day, the fear must have been something you could taste. If you have the opportunity read “Black Thursday” by Martin Cadin, it is the story of the first daylight attack on the ballbearing works at Swinefurt, Germany. We lost sixty B-17 bombers, 600 crew members on the 60 bombers, that one day.

“Polesti” is also an excellent book, about the bomber raids on the oil refineries in Polesti, Romania. I had a friend that flew two of those B-24 missions out of North Africa. Had corn stalks in his engine air intakes and his waist gunners were shooting up, to hit the gunners in the flack towers. When he landed he could not get out of his seat, he had to be lifted by the crew.

Russ’ engineering company HQ was destroyed on 9-11. He had 3 floors in the WTC. He was here when he lost his entire staff.

Ed

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NOt to worry, Ed, you didn't hi-jack anything.  We're all a bunch of friends around here and your experiences are always welcome.

Edited by Chris645
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Earlier this month I was in Springfield Ohio for an event.  Several of us attending arrived Thursday night so we had Friday free so we met up for breakfast then drove over to the Air Force Museum in Dayton.  I've wanted to go for a long time.  The XB-70 in person was something I've always wanted to see in person.

 

My father-in-law flew B-26 Marauders in WWII.  We have his log books.

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On 11/25/2018 at 1:14 PM, Recondo 101 said:

“Polesti” is also an excellent book, about the bomber raids on the oil refineries in Polesti, Romania.

I was born and raised in Pineville, Louisiana and very early on found a large headstone in Greenwood cemetery in Pineville of an Army Air Corps 2nd Lieutenant that died in the bombing raid on the Ploesti oil fields. Regrettably I can not recall that young Airman's name but I have never forgotten his service and sacrifice.

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On 11/24/2018 at 10:56 AM, Recondo 101 said:

My father flew a twin engine Hudson bomber as a US Navy CPO pilot. Yep, we had enlisted pilots. He flew the North Atlantic anti submarine routes during WWII. Dangerous missions, day after day, flying prop plane thousands of miles over freezing water. Ended war with a Presidential Unit Citation for valor, his was also the unit that sent the message “Sighted Sub, Sank Same.” His twin was a gunners mate, below him, on an armed freighter, it had deck guns mounted on each side and each end, we had them on some convoys, as a defense against surfaced U Boats. Their two brothers, one 3rd Army, Normandy, other 1st Marine Div, Iwo. They all returned home.

Ed

 

I had to search that never heard of the Hudson.  Cool plane.  My most sincere admiration for your father and thanks for his service!:salute:

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