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Ive got my old Lok-on lite. No kidding it weighs less than the 12 screw in steps. I need to replace the strap on it though.

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That's pretty lite. I would recommend getting a bow holder. And a foot rest. That 20° you was shooting in sucks even more after a few hours of holding that aluminum riser. A foot rest is definitely worth the money for comfort and some type of foam seat pad can make those long sets almost bearable. Just a thought sir, none of the three will add much weight but sure make the hunt more enjoyable.

http://millenniumstands.com/products/accessories/m600-bow-holder/

http://millenniumstands.com/products/accessories/m104-folding-footrest/

http://millenniumstands.com/products/accessories/m400-cold-weather-pad/

Edited by devil duck

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Well, most of the time it's still in the mid 40s during our deer season. It might be 60s in early Sept during archery.

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I have the M100, without a doubt the most comfortable tree stand I have ever sat in. I liked it so much that I also got the chair for my ground blind.

 

I pair mine with inexpensive ladder sections from Sportsmans guide.

 

http://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/guide-gear-20039-climbing-sticks?a=546743

 

I also picked up a few extra hang 3 extra hanging chains from Bass Pro. I can go in pre season and set up 4 different stand sights and all I have to pack in is the stand itself. Add a 3 pack of these http://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/big-game-multi-hangers-3-pack?a=1333097and some 550 cord and you are in business.

 

I would also suggest getting something like the Hunter Safety System life lines. http://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/hunter-safety-system-lifeline-3-pack?a=1721411 That way after the initial set up you are tied to the tree from the time you leave the ground until the time you are back down. Take them down between seasons and go over them good.

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Oh yea, I second the foot rest. Not only will it enable you to get some relief on the back of your legs, while standing it will give you a reference for the edge of the platform.

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I have the M100, without a doubt the most comfortable tree stand I have ever sat in. I liked it so much that I also got the chair for my ground blind.

 

I pair mine with inexpensive ladder sections from Sportsmans guide.

 

http://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/guide-gear-20039-climbing-sticks?a=546743

 

I also picked up a few extra hang 3 extra hanging chains from Bass Pro. I can go in pre season and set up 4 different stand sights and all I have to pack in is the stand itself. Add a 3 pack of these http://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/big-game-multi-hangers-3-pack?a=1333097and some 550 cord and you are in business.

 

I would also suggest getting something like the Hunter Safety System life lines. http://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/hunter-safety-system-lifeline-3-pack?a=1721411 That way after the initial set up you are tied to the tree from the time you leave the ground until the time you are back down. Take them down between seasons and go over them good.

I like those safety lines. I use a single line kinda like this one. But I can see where these would be faster and less hassle.

https://www.ruralking.com/safety-harness-lineman-s-rope.html?gclid=CjwKCAiA7JfSBRBrEiwA1DWSGw-iAJjtP_CxoMxB3vKa_EFyjSIPdiLDB6Ld8HU-l-xfcu9ZkQAf2xoCWV4QAvD_BwE

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I like those safety lines. I use a single line kinda like this one. But I can see where these would be faster and less hassle.

https://www.ruralking.com/safety-harness-lineman-s-rope.html?gclid=CjwKCAiA7JfSBRBrEiwA1DWSGw-iAJjtP_CxoMxB3vKa_EFyjSIPdiLDB6Ld8HU-l-xfcu9ZkQAf2xoCWV4QAvD_BwE

Pretty much the same thing. I think the HSS version has reflective threads built in and a silencer for the d ring. I use them in all my fixed position set ups. feel much safer climbing in and out of the stand with them.

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Pretty much the same thing. I think the HSS version has reflective threads built in and a silencer for the d ring. I use them in all my fixed position set ups. feel much safer climbing in and out of the stand with them.

 

When I said "these" I was referring to the ones you posted, not the one I use. With yours, you don't have to fool with getting it around the steps/ladder sticks. I will definitely try to get me one for next season.

Do you anchor the line at the bottom or just let it free hang.

 

Im almost embarrassed to tell this. About 25-30 years ago, before the nice safety systems we have today. I bought a really nice single belt system, much like the climbing rope I use for getting in the stand. It had a 2" wide belt that just went around your waist with a D ring. The single rope then went around the tree and you could adjust how much slack you needed. This was actually a really nice safety belt, HD and kinda expensive for what you got. But at the time all you got with a new stand was those cheap "build to fit" webbing systems.

Anyway I was done for the evening, it was lightly drizzling/freezing and I was freezing my butt off. I had lowered my bow and was just about to unhook and start climbing down. I remember stepping over to the ladder stick and because of the icing I slipped off of the step. The next thing I remember was hanging by my waist and in pain. The belt did it's job and kept me from falling but because it was around my waist my stomach took all the force. It took me a few minutes before I was able to upright myself. I had a bruised kidney and some other minor stomach issues from it.

Needless to say I learned a very valuable lesson over that. I started asking around and was amazed at some of the horror stories regarding some of the harnesses being used. Pulling a single belt up around your chest isn't a whole lot better. One hunter died from doing that. He was a bigger man and was found hanging in the tree dead. When he fell it broke some upper ribs and he couldn't breath. I'm sure his weight and the amount of slack in the line was the primary reason but regardless, it can be deadly using these types of harnesses.

Anyone reading this, PLEASE, do not skimp on your safety gear. There are a bunch of horror stories of hunters falling from tree stands. Some deadly, some were lucky, only broken bones. But there are more than a few that are paralyzed from falling. A full harness is needed to distribute your weight and prevent injury.

 

As Red pointed out, use a system that will keep you attached at all times. Those life lines are literally that, your life line.

O, I found more than one story where a hunter had fell and landed on his broadhead tipped arrows, that's gonna leave a mark.

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yeah, I'm getting a good harness and not going to mess around with falling. We're serious about ladders etc around the house. I'm very aware with work of fall danger (had someone walk off a scaffolding- they didn't have their harness hooked up and did a *splat*)

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When I said "these" I was referring to the ones you posted, not the one I use. With yours, you don't have to fool with getting it around the steps/ladder sticks. I will definitely try to get me one for next season.

Do you anchor the line at the bottom or just let it free hang.

I generally tie it off at the bottom to the last rung on the ladder or just below that. Tie it tight the first time as it will stretch a little. Having it secured makes moving the knot up as you climb up much easier and keeps it a one handed job allowed to keep 3 points of contact at all times while climbing. I’ll admit though general one of those points is the knot. Moving the knot down is easy as long as you don’t have any pressure on the tag end of the knot, as soon as it get pressure it locks up tight.

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Another word on harnesses. Make sure the one you buy has the deployable foot loop. Its an extra safety device that you can get your foot in to relieve the pressure of the harness until someone can find you or you can recover. New construction safety harnesses all have this feature and I was glad to see my new hunting harnesses did as well. Definitely go over your harness at least once a year if not every time you use it. Check all stitching for frays and any plastic parts for cracks and decay. As they get older, consider replacing them and if you actually fall definitely replace it. Dont trust your life to a harness that has saved you once. The second time it may not hold. These are things I have learned in a construction oriented fall protection class.

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