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dfairclothrra

barrel nut torque

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I see barrel nut torque specs are 30-80 ft lbs which is to get to the next notch to line up the notch for the gas tube. what would you guys torque a non indexing barrel nut?

 

Thanks Dan

Edited by dfairclothrra

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There will be several opinions on this. In my opinion I have had good results torquing to 45/50 for my builds with a non indexing barrel nut.

 

 

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What about aluminum barrel nuts? Its such a soft metal, I trashed an aluminum nut on my first build. I was not able to torque it anywhere 80 ft. lbs. 30-35 ft.lbs. ultimately.

Edited by ewallover

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I tighten and back it off a few times then go for anything above 40 and let the nut tell me when it's ready.

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Paranoid me does it back and forth a few times normally beginning at 30 in increments of 10 to 40 and then 5s through 50-60. Greased. I go up in the 50s unless otherwise noted by the manufacturer. One of mine has a window from 35-60 vs xx-80.

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The torque spec for the mil-spec barrel nut starts out at 30 ft-lb. That means 30 ft-lb should be sufficient. Tightening it any further will just add stress to the parts. Although, that's for a steel barrel nut. If your barrel nut is a different material, it may necessitate a different torque spec.

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Aluminum is strong enough to handle 70 ft lbs. so from my perspective this is not a concern. However, I would never feel the need to replace a barrel nut after several barrel changes and re torquing on a steel barrel nut. Yet, I would consider changing a aluminum barrel nut that has been reused for multiple builds or barrel changes if using torque values above 55/60 ft lbs. Reasoning is aluminum stretches a little each time and over time you might experience some problems.

 

The point to be made here is the whole idea of torque values in the first place is to assure a rock solid mating of the barrel to the upper receiver. A good gun Smith will recommend you recheck tightness after shooting the gun for 500 rounds or more. Many of my most serious builders and shooter friends also bed the assembly with “green” locktite. Which kind of glues everything together so to speak but factory made guns do not do that nor do military weapons do that.

 

Perhaps one last piece of advice. Make sure you lubricate the threads of your barrel nut and work your torque process tighter and tighter in small increments to let all the parts align properly. Any torque value above 35 ft lbs should be fine.

 

 

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I see barrel nut torque specs are 30-80 ft lbs which is to get to the next notch to line up the notch for the gas tube. what would you guys torque a non indexing barrel nut?

 

Thanks Dan

me 35 to 45 lbs.

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30-80 is wide enough for any type. As everybody mentioned, some type of lube should be used. I like anti seize, just a dab on the beginning threads as a little bit goes a long way. This is especially necessary on different metals, i.e. aluminum receiver and steel barrel nuts. Aluminum to aluminum can gall the threads if no lube it used and then your screwed. If you dont have any anti seize in your auto tool box, you can get a small packet at the counter of your auto parts store. There is enough to do several barrel nuts in each packet.

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