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bj139

Crossbow Safety

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I just bought my first crossbow, a Barnett Recruit Tactical and was searching the internet for info and ran across this.

Check out the .jpg files near the bottom. 

This should be required viewing for new crossbow users. Yikes.

https://www.saferproducts.gov/ViewIncident/1304878

 

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Two points:

 

1. It'll probably buff out.

2. Thumb stew in that slow cooker?

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They can hurt you bad is less than a blink. NEVER allow any body part above the rail in front of the string when it's cocked.

Be conscientious and enjoy your new bow! "Thumbs up" is like bragging in the world of crossbows and calf roping. :bellylaf: 

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On 2/23/2019 at 12:17 PM, bamashooter said:

Two points:

 

1. It'll probably buff out.

2. Thumb stew in that slow cooker?

You could tie a sting on it and the pot ans pull it out after if flavors the stew then freeze it for reuse.  yummmmmmmmmmmmmm

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Barnett added some digital (thumb and finger) guards to the model I bought. I will still be very aware when I shoot it.

I would like to be able to uncock it by reversing the cocking procedure but I am not sure if the anti dry fire will allow this.

I am thinking having your foot in the stirrup with an arrow in the  crossbow is a bad idea.  Like resting the muzzle of a loaded gun on your foot.:ohmy:

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1 hour ago, bj139 said:

Barnett added some digital (thumb and finger) guards to the model I bought. I will still be very aware when I shoot it.

I would like to be able to uncock it by reversing the cocking procedure but I am not sure if the anti dry fire will allow this.

I am thinking having your foot in the stirrup with an arrow in the  crossbow is a bad idea.  Like resting the muzzle of a loaded gun on your foot.:ohmy:

There is only one truly safe way to decock a compound crossbow, and that is to shoot it. You can get small discharge targets and use a target arrow to discharge it,  but I can't in good conscience recommend actually letting the string down even if the anti-dryfire mechanism allows it. It's too tough to gage the timing and effort necessary to hang on to it when the cams break over.

On recurves like Excalibur sells it's a whole different story, but on compounds it's just a bad idea.

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I'm feeling a bit proud of myself today.  The crossbow I bought on Walmart.com last Tuesday for $178 is now $290.  I can now buy more bolts.

There is an ovious defect in this bow, which is, they put the Barnett emblem upside down on the left side of my bow.  For $112 I think I can live with it.:bellylaf:

Thanks Longhair, for all the suggestions.  I think if I shoot my thumb off now, it will be my own damn fault.  Barnett has two blocks to prevent the digits from going above the rail but you know Murphy's law.  "Nothing can be made foolproof since fools are so ingenius."  They will always find a way.:laugh:

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What are you using for lube? The Barnett rail lube that came with the bow?

And what components are you lubing?

 

I've found that I get the best string life using pure bee's wax. I wax only the stranded parts of the string and cables, NOT the served areas. I also work the wax into the rail itself, letting the center serving pick up ONLY what it does from the rail. Bee's wax is not as greasy and messy as a lot of the snot that's on the market, and it doesn't tend to pick up nearly as much dirt and crud as the slimier lubes either. YMMV

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4 hours ago, Longhair said:

What are you using for lube? The Barnett rail lube that came with the bow?

And what components are you lubing?

 

I've found that I get the best string life using pure bee's wax. I wax only the stranded parts of the string and cables, NOT the served areas. I also work the wax into the rail itself, letting the center serving pick up ONLY what it does from the rail. Bee's wax is not as greasy and messy as a lot of the snot that's on the market, and it doesn't tend to pick up nearly as much dirt and crud as the slimier lubes either. YMMV

I put a little of the Barnett chapstick lube on the string and rail.  I didn't fully cock it since I would have to shoot it to decock it.  It seems easy enough to cock with the rope.

On the xbow forum someone said to get unscented Chapstick.  I have some beeswax which I will try.

The cables don't seem to be steel as on my compound bow.  I should try a magnet.

If they are not, should I should lube the cable portion of the string as well?

 

I am planning on trying deer archery hunting again this fall after about 30 years of no archery hunting.  I tried to pull my compound bow back a few days ago and could not do it.

I guess it is the right time for me to get a crossbow.

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The cables are NOT steel/metal, and "yes" do lube them, but just as with the string do NOT lube the served parts.

 

Also, be careful with the rope cocker. I've had one of the plastic hooks break before, and it wasn't a good time. I made up one that incorporated a second set of steel hooks that faced in the opposite direction that didn't actually engage the string, but acted as a secondary safety (insurance) so I wouldn't suffer the same catastrophe as I did with the one that failed. 

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I am trying to figure a safe way to uncock it with the rope cocker since it has an anti dryfire mechanism.  I have seen some videos and read about it.

I think I will try it with a drinking straw in place of the arrow to defeat the anti dryfire mechanism.  If I shoot a drinking straw through my foot I might report here or I might be too embarassed.:wacko:

I don't feel safe shooting a bolt in the back yard and breaking it or having it deflect into a neighbors yard.

I feel I should address all known safety issues before I try anything new instead of  "just do it".

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Bad idea.

Just take a cardboard box and stuff it with old clothes, tape it up and shoot it.

Trying to uncock it is way less safe. You're more likely to break something (including possibly you), especially if you've never tried to cock it with one hand to know what kind of demand is going to be placed on that hand/arm. There are all kinds of YouTube videos out there that show "how-to" do a lot of foolish stuff.

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I figured out how to uncock it without shooting.

Edited by bj139

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I almost feel sorry for the guy but he obviously did something wrong and has no reason to biotch.  Most cross bows I see now have fluting at the fore stock and come equipped with a fore grip to naturally keep appendages below the danger zone.  My new Carbon Express Pile Driver has both of these.  The fore grip is nice and easy to use keeping fingers well below cable path.

 

As far as decocking, I wouldnt try any method other than shooting a decocking bolt or a cheap bolt into a safe stop of some kind.  I would be curious as to what you have figured out.

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