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BoomerG20

Remington Viper 522.....

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Posted (edited)

Anyone have any experience with these? I had to repair one and I'm not impressed with it at all... it must have been the cheapest model they made.

Edited by BoomerG20

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Looks kinda cheap, but honestly have never played with one.

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polymer reciever.....

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Cheap crap and plastic guns are nothing new for Remington. As a matter of fact, for decades they have produced one good firearm for every half dozen turkeys. And that's not to say that their cheap crap isn't accurate (even a blind squirrel finds a nut every now and then), it's just poorly designed, cheaply made, and the "craftsmanship" is poor.

What they have traditionally had going for them is a good marketing team. Add one or two excellent products and a bunch of cut-rate stuff that you can peddle to the masses, and you have a successful company.

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51 minutes ago, gshayd said:

polymer reciever.....

 Yup... receiver, both halves... plastic, the only steel was the barrel, firing pin, trigger, springs, bolt and firing group 

 

1 minute ago, Longhair said:

Cheap crap and plastic guns are nothing new for Remington. As a matter of fact, for decades they have produced one good firearm for every half dozen turkeys. And that's not to say that their cheap crap isn't accurate (even a blind squirrel finds a nut every now and then), it's just poorly designed, cheaply made, and the "craftsmanship" is poor.

What they have traditionally had going for them is a good marketing team. Add one or two excellent products and a bunch of cut-rate stuff that you can peddle to the masses, and you have a successful company.

I couldn’t believe everything inside the receiver was heat staked, there’s no way to replace parts or work on it. The levers, springs, trigger and mag disconnect all could be replaced but everything else your screwed, the steel firing pin is staked into a bolt like feature, the ejector is a steel piece staked into a plastic block that is staked to the lower receiver, you can’t replace it you need the whole receiver....  complete junk

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Posted (edited)
19 minutes ago, BoomerG20 said:

I couldn’t believe everything inside the receiver was heat staked, there’s no way to replace parts or work on it. The levers, springs, trigger and mag disconnect all could be replaced but everything else your screwed, the steel firing pin is staked into a bolt like feature, the ejector is a steel piece staked into a plastic block that is staked to the lower receiver, you can’t replace it you need the whole receiver....  complete junk

Ever see or work on a Nylon 66 or 67? They have a stamped sheet metal saddle over a plastic receiver that is integral with the one piece stock. The receiver shroud, bolt, barrel, barrel retainer, sights, and a few springs & screws are all that's metal

 

malorazka-remington-nylon-66-mb-22-lr.jp

18036668_1.jpg?v=8D0B102830C1CE0

Edited by Longhair
ETA: Added a pic of the Nylon 67

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35 minutes ago, Longhair said:

Ever see or work on a Nylon 66 or 67? They have a stamped sheet metal saddle over a plastic receiver that is integral with the one piece stock. The receiver shroud, bolt, barrel, barrel retainer, sights, and a few springs & screws are all that's metal

 

malorazka-remington-nylon-66-mb-22-lr.jp

18036668_1.jpg?v=8D0B102830C1CE0

 

Had a 66 a long time ago, never could figure out why they are so popular (expensive/collectible) now.

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1 hour ago, BoomerG20 said:

Had a 66 a long time ago, never could figure out why they are so popular (expensive/collectible) now.

I feel the same way about the old Marlin Glenfield Model 60. What a POS! They sold for $49 new, were a horrible design, constructed with garbage materials, and now people act like they are the greatest thing since sliced bread. I really don't get it. Back when the Model 60 was $49, a new 10/22 was $55 or $56, and they were easily ten times better mechanically. If Ruger had put a stock on the 10/22 that didn't feel like you were shouldering a chunk of fence post, nobody would have ever bought a Model 60.

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10 hours ago, Longhair said:

I feel the same way about the old Marlin Glenfield Model 60. What a POS! They sold for $49 new, were a horrible design, constructed with garbage materials, and now people act like they are the greatest thing since sliced bread. I really don't get it. Back when the Model 60 was $49, a new 10/22 was $55 or $56, and they were easily ten times better mechanically. If Ruger had put a stock on the 10/22 that didn't feel like you were shouldering a chunk of fence post, nobody would have ever bought a Model 60.

Yup, i bought my model 60 for that exact reason, the 10/22 felt like a 2x4 with a barrel sticking out of it...

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I loved my Marlin 60.

 

i bet I put over 30,000 rounds through that damned thing before it got worn out!

 

The first problem was with trigger reset.  Seems as a youth, when I'd tear it down to clean it and then re-assemble it, I was torqing down the assembly screw too hard and was decreasing clearances on the inside.

 

Got that fixed, and then the feed assembly got worn out so I payed a minimal fee to replace that small (pot metal) part.

 

Finally had to make a new firing pin out of spring steel as the original was pretty worn out.

 

Still got it in my safe to this day!

 

 

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12 minutes ago, newbe said:

I loved my Marlin 60.

 

i bet I put over 30,000 rounds through that damned thing before it got worn out!

 

The first problem was with trigger reset.  Seems as a youth, when I'd tear it down to clean it and then re-assemble it, I was torqing down the assembly screw too hard and was decreasing clearances on the inside.

 

Got that fixed, and then the feed assembly got worn out so I payed a minimal fee to replace that small (pot metal) part.

 

Finally had to make a new firing pin out of spring steel as the original was pretty worn out.

 

Still got it in my safe to this day!

 

 

Mine is not much better than yours....tons of rounds through it and very poor maintenance from my end. I have mine working really well right now and it gets shot very little just to preserve it a little longer. My receiver is wearing out where the bolt rides on it..... it's a cheap gun that lasted a very long time for me and is still super accurate. It was my only pdog gun for years.....I had the holdovers down pretty good out to 120 yards with it. 

 

 

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17 minutes ago, newbe said:

I loved my Marlin 60.

 

i bet I put over 30,000 rounds through that damned thing before it got worn out!

 

The first problem was with trigger reset.  Seems as a youth, when I'd tear it down to clean it and then re-assemble it, I was torqing down the assembly screw too hard and was decreasing clearances on the inside.

 

Got that fixed, and then the feed assembly got worn out so I payed a minimal fee to replace that small (pot metal) part.

 

Finally had to make a new firing pin out of spring steel as the original was pretty worn out.

 

Still got it in my safe to this day!

 

 

You must have had one of the re-designed (newer) ones. The originals never lasted anywhere near that long before failure. They had a stupid little spring steel piece in the top of the receiver (cartridge guide spring) that was notorious for getting damaged, rendering the gun useless unless you manually chambered each round. And the only way to replace the buggered guide involved pulling the barrel off.

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13 minutes ago, Longhair said:

You must have had one of the re-designed (newer) ones. The originals never lasted anywhere near that long before failure. They had a stupid little spring steel piece in the top of the receiver (cartridge guide spring) that was notorious for getting damaged, rendering the gun useless unless you manually chambered each round. And the only way to replace the buggered guide involved pulling the barrel off.

Bought mine brand new in 1985 I believe I was.  It was the special edition with the gold squirrel emblem on the stock and held 18 rounds in the tube. Yet another reason I liked it.

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I never came back to the house till I'd put a brick of .22 through it.

 

It was pretty caked with powder and crud by the time I brought it back home to clean it.  Lol

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1 minute ago, newbe said:

Bought mine brand new in 1985 I believe I was.  It was the special edition with the gold squirrel emblem on the stock and held 18 rounds in the tube. Yet another reason I liked it.

Ten years earlier, you'd have been lucky to have gone through 100rnds without a failure. Many didn't make it through the first box (50rnds). They were horrible!

The first week of small game season my repair rack would have more Model 60's in it than all others combined.

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