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Chris645

Annealing question

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I've just inherited what is known in the jewely trade as a "burn-out oven".  It will reach 2000 degrees.  I'm wondering if there would be any way I could protect the bottom portion of my brass cases and anneal the necks in this oven.  If I stand the cases up in water, do you think the water would evaporate before the annealing job was complete?  {Thinking outside the box here!)

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Seeing how 800 degrees is the ideal temp you might have fun getting the timing right to use that oven.......

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I can adjust the temp to any given temp up to 2,000 degrees.  So I could heat up the oven to 800 degrees and then set the tray of cases in it.  But, on second thought, I'd probably have trouble keeping them from falling over.  Maybe this isn't such a good idea after all.  Oh well, my main plan for the oven is annealing and tempering knife blades.  Maybe I'll just keep using my case annealing method as it is.

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Posted (edited)
8 minutes ago, Chris645 said:

I can adjust the temp to any given temp up to 2,000 degrees.  So I could heat up the oven to 800 degrees and then set the tray of cases in it.  But, on second thought, I'd probably have trouble keeping them from falling over.  Maybe this isn't such a good idea after all.  Oh well, my main plan for the oven is annealing and tempering knife blades.  Maybe I'll just keep using my case annealing method as it is.

You can't anneal cases in a oven! You just anneal the mouth. Here's what I use along with tempilaq. I anneal the mouths to 750 degrees and paint the base with 480 to be sure it doesn't heat up. 

 

Edit: just read original post. Make sure you use something like tempilaq to make sure you don't anneal the brass past the mouth. 

 

https://annealeez.com/product/annealeez/

Edited by Joel74

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http://www.massreloading.com/annealing.html
 
What Are The Specifics?

Brass is annealed by heating it to a certain temperature for a certain amount of time. The higher the annealing temperature, the shorter the time required to anneal. The grain structure of the brass begins to change - indicating the start of annealing - at just under 500 degrees Fahrenheit. At 600 degrees F, brass will anneal in one hour. At 800 degrees F, brass will take only a few seconds to anneal.

Only the case necks should be annealed. If the case body or head is allowed to overheat, the case will be completely and irrevocably ruined for reloading. Also, no portion of the case should ever be allowed to reach 950 degrees F. At this temperature, over-annealing will occur, rendering the brass too soft and weak to reload.

As you can see, annealing is a balancing act - the neck must be heated (but not overheated) to the appropriate temperature for the appropriate time, while ensuring that the rest of the case does not reach a temperature that will cause it to soften as well. In addition, your process needs to be very consistent from case-to-case in order to preserve accuracy.

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Been annealing cases for the past 10 years, so am aware only the necks need to be treated.  I was just wondering if I could stand them up in a pot of water and only heat the necks via the oven.  Probably not, but it was a thought.  I've always got thoughts running around in my head.  Some times they are spectacularly brilliant............other times not so! :yukyuk:  Maybe this was the latter, ya think?

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Just now, Chris645 said:

Been annealing cases for the past 10 years, so am aware only the necks need to be treated.  I was just wondering if I could stand them up in a pot of water and only heat the necks via the oven.  Probably not, but it was a thought.  I've always got thoughts running around in my head.  Some times they are spectacularly brilliant............other times not so! :yukyuk:  Maybe this was the latter, ya think?

Okay. Just not sure who else might be reading (lurking in the weeds). Sorry if I came off as being a know it all. I just know enough to know I don't know it all.

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Posted (edited)

Maybe you could make a box and cover it with a heat shield that had the necks exposed and put it in your oven. It would take longer to load and cool down than the time in the oven.

 

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/hsp-120614?seid=srese1&cm_mmc=pla-google-_-shopping-_-srese1-_-heatshield-products&gclid=Cj0KCQjws5HlBRDIARIsAOomqA1JgVHASlMIp0uRbQikNI2y2KX75CqdKpaK4qZAdmVQoJhR9Cob_PcaAoFUEALw_wcB

Edited by Joel74

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I would advise NOT doing that. You will not be able to control the heat migration from the neck down toward the case head adequately  IMHO.  The water would work for a few but as it approaches the boiling point rapidly the heat sink properties will decease dramatically. Perhaps Tom Jefferson will chime in her as he is the metallurgy God.

 

Greg

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After the points you  two have made I think I'll just use the oven in my knife making process.  Thanks for the input.  You forced me to put on my thinkin' cap. :hmm:

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22 minutes ago, Chris645 said:

After the points you  two have made I think I'll just use the oven in my knife making process.  Thanks for the input.  You forced me to put on my thinkin' cap. :hmm:

 

And see this time I didn't cost you a dime!! Who'd thunk it???  :tiphat:

 

Greg

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No Chit!!!!  Usually a suggestion from you means my bank account is going to be in trouble...........or I'm gonna be in trouble with the little lady if I spend the money! :hysterical3:

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