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"Kit" dilemma-What do you consider essential to keep in your vehicle?

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Been driving a 1996 chevy silverdo since it was new.  200K miles.  Runs excellent but getting wary because of its age/mileage.  Just bought a "NEW" truck, a 2007 Chevy Silverado, still 13 years old.  Both extended cab.  BUT, my "old" 1996 must have 4 times the storage in it.  Plus the 1996 has a nice shell over the back, new one does not and cant afford to put one on it.

Old truck I could break down and survive 2 weeks until rescued if necessary.  New one, just dont have the space to put all that stuff.

 

So, The question is, WHAT do you keep in your vehicle for an emergency???  I live way out in the country, easily be 2-4 days before rescued.  Oregon weather, not super hot or cold, but very wet.  I do already keep an upgraded STOMP first aide kit in it and a very high capacity fire extinguisher.  Also keep a 9mm pistol in a hornady cabled gun safe under the back seat.  Unfortunately, these 3 items take up 80% of all the space available in the truck.  Old truck, maybe 35%.  So having to be judicious with what I want to carry 24/7 in the truck for the unknown emergency. Figure getting stuck for 3 or 4 days.  I have a cell phone, but dosent work 90% of the time where I live.

What do/would you add/subtract in your vehicle if you were in my situation?  This isnt an exercise, this is the reality of what I need to decide and do.

 

Things I have put in already, right or wrong.....  jumper cables, couple flares, tarp, a few food bars, water purification bottle, Breaker bar with socket to fit lug nuts, toilet paper, towel, couple of flashlights, bug repellent, map.... pretty much all that I could fit easy. Also have AAA but if phone dosent work/get a signal pretty useless.

 

Would like to add but dont have space, but willing to swap with existing items...  Things like the sleeping bag would have to live on top of the back seat, no room to stow it away.  Had ALL these items in the old truck and never noticed they were there, so much more room:

Sleeping bag

Emergency food like Datrix

Blankets

Coat and rain coat

tools (wrenches and sockets)

Spare fuses

Electric tape

Hydraulic jack

Fix-a-flat

4 ton come along

Rope

Tow strap

Ice walkers ... things for your shoes if you have to walk on ice

Spare clothing, cold and warm weather, spare pair of shoes

Water

recovery kit... shovel, jacks, chains, straps, traction mats, ropes and ground spikes, mini air compressor to re-inflate tires after letting air out to get unstuck

Esbit or similar stove

container to boil water in

shovel, pick, farm jack, misc accessories to use with them

 

OK, just going to stop here.  What do/would you keep in your vehicle?  How would you prioritize and why?  Remember, this is real life for me, I DO NOT live in or near a city.  I have had to use all these things at one time or another in my old truck.  But it had space to keep it all.  New truck does not which totally baffles me.

 

Let me know your thoughts.  And, NO, not going to move into an apartment in the city!!  :segrin:  Rather deal with my current situation.

 

Appreciate any of yur thoughts and recommendations.

 

John

 

 

 

 

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I've been wanting to pick up one of those rechargeable gizmos to jump start your car so you don't have to wait for someone to come along who is willing to stop and give you a jump. A CB radio or portable Ham might not be a bad idea for emergencies, especially if you spend a lot of time off the beaten path where cell coverage is spotty.  I did not see anything to make fire with, although many older vehicles still have cigarette lighters. 

 

Cars have and emergency fuel shut off that can sometimes trip even in a minor accident. Fords seemed to be a make that tripped easily, like tapping a pole in a parking lot, or slidining slowly into a tree off an icy road.  No matter what you do, the car's not gonna start because it is not getting fuel. The reset for this was in the trunk.

Folks might waant to check their owner's amnuals to see if cars still have this feature, and it might save you a lot of grief. It did not take a deacceleration that was enough to trigger airbag deployment for the emergency fuel shat off to kick in. 

 

https://freeonplate.com/find-and-reset-fuel-cut-off-switch/

https://itstillruns.com/reset-ford-fuel-shutoff-7367396.html

 

It looks as if my memory was correct that the major offenders are Fords tripping when there was no reason to. 

But there were a number of other makes that have them, including Chevy. 

I remember sending a number of people involved in minor crashes happily on their way by resetting the auto shut off in the trunk on Fords at the time. 

Looks like they are still in pretty widespread use, but they hide them in different places, and apparently don't want the driver resetting them for liability reasons....

Sure beats being stranded in the middle of nowhere in winter because your shut off tripped from hitting a snowbank....

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Take a book and one of those little book lights. If you can't do anything else you can always read.

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I have even less room in my pickup as it's a single cab. You would be amazed at how much junk and loose ammo will float around in it though. I have a cross bed tool box stuffed with all the goodies I need. The door pockets are overflowing with small stuff and behind the seat is a bunch of jackets and towels. Under the seats are Kleenex, water, and other small crap. The new rigs have less space for sure. 

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AAA card and cellphone.  :segrin:

 

Actually I'm over the silly level of stuff in my truck.  Its my foul weather rescue vehicle.  I could probably take up homesteading with it although I'd probably run out of TP is a few days. 

 

Now in my cars, they all have air pumps, plugs, and slime for slow leaks but then I live by a few rules like never go in a car if you are not dressed for the weather and if you see me I'm armed, etc.  When I do trips, I have a "go bag" and keep some bottle water and tools for simple repairs.  Winter a small folding shovel, large can of salt, and EM blankets are added.

 

Tj

 

 

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3 minutes ago, TomJefferson said:

AAA card and cellphone.  :segrin:

 

Actually I'm over the silly level of stuff in my truck.  Its my foul weather rescue vehicle.  I could probably take up homesteading with it although I'd probably run out of TP is a few days. 

 

Now in my cars, they all have air pumps, plugs, and slime for slow leaks but then I live by a few rules like never go in a car if you are not dressed for the weather and if you see me I'm armed, etc.  When I do trips, I have a "go bag" and keep some bottle water and tools for simple repairs.  Winter a small folding shovel, large can of salt, and EM blankets are added.

 

Tj

 

 

Oh, my gawd....Dressing for the weather.......always dress for the outside weather when traveling. I have co-workers that show up at work on a snowy day wearing shorts and flip flops. 

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If I removed all the extra stuff from my rig, my mileage would probably improve by 30 percent.

 

 

Matt

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12 hours ago, Retcop said:

I've been wanting to pick up one of those rechargeable gizmos to jump start your car so you don't have to wait for someone to come along who is willing to stop and give you a jump. A CB radio or portable Ham might not be a bad idea for emergencies, especially if you spend a lot of time off the beaten path where cell coverage is spotty.  I did not see anything to make fire with, although many older vehicles still have cigarette lighters. 

 

Cars have and emergency fuel shut off that can sometimes trip even in a minor accident. Fords seemed to be a make that tripped easily, like tapping a pole in a parking lot, or slidining slowly into a tree off an icy road.  No matter what you do, the car's not gonna start because it is not getting fuel. The reset for this was in the trunk.

Folks might waant to check their owner's amnuals to see if cars still have this feature, and it might save you a lot of grief. It did not take a deacceleration that was enough to trigger airbag deployment for the emergency fuel shat off to kick in. 

 

https://freeonplate.com/find-and-reset-fuel-cut-off-switch/

https://itstillruns.com/reset-ford-fuel-shutoff-7367396.html

 

It looks as if my memory was correct that the major offenders are Fords tripping when there was no reason to. 

But there were a number of other makes that have them, including Chevy. 

I remember sending a number of people involved in minor crashes happily on their way by resetting the auto shut off in the trunk on Fords at the time. 

Looks like they are still in pretty widespread use, but they hide them in different places, and apparently don't want the driver resetting them for liability reasons....

Sure beats being stranded in the middle of nowhere in winter because your shut off tripped from hitting a snowbank....

 

I did buy one of those jumpers.  Charged it and stowed under the seat, never tried it.  Brother-in-law says his company puts them in all their vehicles and that they are great.  Said they will hold a good charge for 6 months or more.

I did also toss a small pocket survival kit under the seat, it has life boat matches, water tabs etc... but just the basics.

 

I found a space blanket and a SOL space type sleep bag in my shed last night.  Will toss them under the seat also.

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