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tommag

Ordered a new pocket knife

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https://www.bladehq.com/item--Kizer-Cutlery-Ki3404A3-BB-Frame--25604

My kershaw didnt hold an edge that well, and had become hard to open. I took it apart and cleaned it, making it even stiffer.

I chose this one because of the flipper tab and thumb studs, as well as better quality steel.

Since I travel through many jurisdictions,  I didn't want a spring assist or a longer blade.

Waiting for it to show up.

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Time for an update. I carry my knives in my pocket, not with the clip. Over all, it's a good knife, but the back of the knife is open and will frequently have a coin lodged in there when I pull it out. Not a big deal for everyday use, but I suppose it would be if I needed to use it as a weapon. It is fairly quick to sharpen, but somehow holds an edge well. (I always thought those two characteristics were mutually exclusive.) Having gotten used to carbon fiber scales, it's a little heavier,  but that's not a big deal. 

 

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What grind do you find to be easy to sharpen but still hold an edge well enough to last through a decent size job ?

 

Somewhere between my boyhood  Case and Buck knives, they have made the knowledge required to get the right knife for the job like guessing which wire to cut on the 

ticking bomb. Which steel ? What grind ? Partially serrated is stoopid. Partially serrated has gotten me out of a tough spot...What profile, what point ? etc.

Study up on the internet before you shop for a knife ? 

 

All I know is I went from using an old worn stone that my Dad had for eons to put a lasting scalpel edge on a blade, to getting nowhere trying to sharpen some steels, 

to ruining an edge that I could never get sharp like new again until I learned which way to hold my tongue and howl at the moon as I sharpened the steel and grind from Mars...

And even then it's a PIA...

 

Used to be grab that old stone, a few drops of oil, and 15 enjoyable minutes or so later I was back GTG. Now it's 3 or 4 different types of sharpeners, and a prayer. 

No, I don't need a steel that will remain unmolested submerged 3 months in saltwater, nor do I need some fancy grind that I need a degree in math to sharpen. 

Is it me, or have they made it unnecessarily complicated and the sharpening more difficult than back in the day.

 

Congrats on the knife !

Curious as why you don't use the clip (just curious), and if you have figured out the coin issue yet ?

 

John

 

 

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Um...keep your coins in the other pocket. :tiphat:

 

Glad the new knife is working well for you.

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1 hour ago, Joel74 said:

Um...keep your coins in the other pocket. :tiphat:

 

Glad the new knife is working well for you.

 

I was wondering how long that would take...:laugh:

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Joel, the other pocket usually has a holster in it😁.

John, I can identify with you on sharpening. I think the old high carbon steels were much easier to sharpen. Until I started reading here, I had no idea how many different steels were available. I use Arkansas oil stones at home and a Smith's diamond stone on the road. I sharpen one side until I get a slight burr and repeat on the other side. Then, I do four or five strokes each side, eventually going down to one stroke on each side.

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I don't use the clip because I don't like the knife being visible. 

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14 minutes ago, tommag said:

I don't use the clip because I don't like the knife being visible. 

 

Greyman...

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18 minutes ago, tommag said:

Joel, the other pocket usually has a holster in it😁.

John, I can identify with you on sharpening. I think the old high carbon steels were much easier to sharpen. Until I started reading here, I had no idea how many different steels were available. I use Arkansas oil stones at home and a Smith's diamond stone on the road. I sharpen one side until I get a slight burr and repeat on the other side. Then, I do four or five strokes each side, eventually going down to one stroke on each side.

Maybe one of these coin holders.

 

https://www.amazon.com/Change-Holder-Included-Nabob-Quality/dp/B01N1RQZU9/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=rubber+coin+holder&qid=1587399841&s=apparel&sr=1-2

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50 minutes ago, Retcop said:

 

Greyman...

My favorite color. 

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16 hours ago, Joel74 said:

 

That's a gas !   One of my Aunt's gave me one of those when I was a kid. 

I am amazed they are still making them.  I wonder if my younger grandkids would like those. 

They all save their money to buy things they really want. In one place I lived, it was a long bike ride to town

and the Woolworth's for some candy. Those came in handy, but soon got relegated to the shoe box that held special treasures, like certain coins. 

Where are those buffalo nickels ? 

All of my older female relatives carried little change purses with metal clasps. It was not that many years ago I saw an elderly gentleman using the coin holder you posted

when paying at the checkout line. I assumed he had had it forever.  :thumb:    Thanks for the memories.

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