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Just a Thought


Saikatana
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On my highschool test. 
What was the first message Alexander Graham Bell sent by telephone? I didn't know so I guessed,"You car warranty is about to expire?"
 
 
A little girl walks into a pet shop.
She walks up to the counter and says, "Excuse me, may I buy a wabbit, pwease?"
The shopkeeper thinks this is just the cutest thing ever. "Sure," he says sweetly. "Do you want a white wabbit or a bwown wabbit?"
The little girl says, "I don't think my pyfon gives a crap."
 
 
My wife is mad at me for ruining her birthday  Ridiculous,............................... I didn't even know it was her birthday.
 
 
What's the most progressive thing about Biden?......His dementia.
 
 
"You don't need 30 round to hunt."  True... but our forefathers didn't write the 2nd amendment because the deer were coming.
 
 
AOC “Officer, you can’t give me a ticket. I have to go run the marathon tomorrow.
Cop: That’s not how you play the race card.
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I can't wait to see my wife, or for both of us to see Biden on the glass teat.*     :bellylaf:

 

I'll be saving those two for the right context. 

 

* My Mom thought that television was the Devil's work, especially for children. She was way ahead of her time when she predicted that Moms would park their kids in front of it instead of parenting. Thus, she referred to it as the "glass teat". For our younger members, TVs used to have what was basically a giant tube as the screen, and the screen surface was glass. 

I have fond memories of my father using any excuse to test the smaller tubes in our TV. I remember enjoying working with him to get the TV apart, and placing the tubes carefully in a paper bag lined with an old rag, and just he and I driving to the hardware store to carefully multi test each tube to make sure they were not coming to the end of their life. "If you let a tube burn out, it can blow other tubes out, or or even ruin the picture tube", he would gravely say.  I felt like it was a manly right of passage, like all the other DIY stuff Dad taught me to do around the house. Each tube had a number on its glass surface, and you had to set all or some of the many dials and switches on the testing machine to different settings depending on the tube, and then also to test different parameters of each tube. These settings had to be looked up on one of dozens of laminated large cards, spiral bound and attached above the tray of the tester, where you placed the tubes in preparation for testing. One would think we were building an atom bomb. (Dad did work his way through an Electrician's school)  I thoroughly enjoyed it for many years, and the TV did last forever. I was about the last kid at school without a color TV.  Then many years later, my Dad came home with a color TV after the B&W with the almost round picture tube bit the dust.  Dad said it could not be fixed, or would cost more than a new one to fix. I think he said it was the power supply... I was about the last person in school to get a color TV, since Dad said there was nothing wrong with this one until it gasped it's last.  With a new color TV, my Mom went on for quite days about the evils of the (color) Glass Teat to life on Earth...and she was not too far off at all.

Now that everyone has nostalgia nausea, I shall leave it at that.   Beware the glass teat !

John

 

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On 4/18/2021 at 4:48 PM, Retcop said:

I can't wait to see my wife, or for both of us to see Biden on the glass teat.*     :bellylaf:

 

I'll be saving those two for the right context. 

 

* My Mom thought that television was the Devil's work, especially for children. She was way ahead of her time when she predicted that Moms would park their kids in front of it instead of parenting. Thus, she referred to it as the "glass teat". For our younger members, TVs used to have what was basically a giant tube as the screen, and the screen surface was glass. 

I have fond memories of my father using any excuse to test the smaller tubes in our TV. I remember enjoying working with him to get the TV apart, and placing the tubes carefully in a paper bag lined with an old rag, and just he and I driving to the hardware store to carefully multi test each tube to make sure they were not coming to the end of their life. "If you let a tube burn out, it can blow other tubes out, or or even ruin the picture tube", he would gravely say.  I felt like it was a manly right of passage, like all the other DIY stuff Dad taught me to do around the house. Each tube had a number on its glass surface, and you had to set all or some of the many dials and switches on the testing machine to different settings depending on the tube, and then also to test different parameters of each tube. These settings had to be looked up on one of dozens of laminated large cards, spiral bound and attached above the tray of the tester, where you placed the tubes in preparation for testing. One would think we were building an atom bomb. (Dad did work his way through an Electrician's school)  I thoroughly enjoyed it for many years, and the TV did last forever. I was about the last kid at school without a color TV.  Then many years later, my Dad came home with a color TV after the B&W with the almost round picture tube bit the dust.  Dad said it could not be fixed, or would cost more than a new one to fix. I think he said it was the power supply... I was about the last person in school to get a color TV, since Dad said there was nothing wrong with this one until it gasped it's last.  With a new color TV, my Mom went on for quite days about the evils of the (color) Glass Teat to life on Earth...and she was not too far off at all.

Now that everyone has nostalgia nausea, I shall leave it at that.   Beware the glass teat !

John

 

Real radios (or TVs) glow in the dark...

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3 hours ago, smb5769 said:

Real radios (or TVs) glow in the dark...

I think my first receiver that I owned myself was a Hammarlund HQ110, general coverage receiver. I remember I would put on the headphones late at night, turn off all the lights except a small desk lamp pointing down at the desktop, and spend hours scrolling through every station I could hear, carefully logging each one. I loved that massive old radio. There was always something almost alive about it as it warmed up, and the soft glow from the tubes and the bulbs illuminating the dials. I started playing with radios about 1983 with that one, and it took me until about 1998 or so until I had my own solid state HF transceiver. And I still like to waste a night in the radio room with the lights out except for a small desk lamp, and tune in the world... too bad none of my radios glow anymore.... 

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One of the first official written "research papers" i ever did in grade school was about the revolutionary invention of the transistor. The teacher praised it up and down, and put a note on it.  A while later, my Dad presented me with a two transistor handheld battery powered radio. What my parents did not know, was that I could pull in WOR in NYC, from our home in East Brunswick, NJ which was not far from Rutgers and Princeton. I remember going to Rutgers football games with my Dad, My sister was something of a violin prodigy. Some college violin virtuoso and teacher, agreed to take her on as a student. 

She became the youngest member ever of the New Jersey State Orchestra, as she was still in High School. 

 

Anyway, late night I listened to one of the best story tellers and comedians covering Americana I had ever hear in my life time, Jean Shepherd. 

He was a renaissance man, and even wrote for Car and Driver for a while, back when they were putting out an extraordinary magazine. I was up for hours 5 nights a week listening to Jean, and you could not help but feel that you knew him. Jean was a person who could relate the toughness, the resiliency, and the attitude of people who grew up on the streets NYC, (and all over the country) before it became the home of bun wearing girliemen,  men hating lesbians, and radicals who had no cause. 

 

If anyone wants to understand a big slice of Americana, and what Americans are really made of, find some tapes or articles or books written by Jean Shepherd. Our young guys will be enlightened, and our older members will instantly relate, no matter where you were from. Because back then, the only things that mattered was than you were a hardworking man whose word was his bond, and the only division was whether you were an American or not. It was back when all men seemed to have the same attitude as my Hoosier father,  and that was no fear when doing the right thing. 

 

I'm not saying times were 100% better times, (polio, pollution) but they sure were simpler times, when just being Americans brought us all together, because just like the neighborhood you lived it, being an American meant we would all come together to be the toughest SOB's who would protect the neighborhood against anyone, and as Americans we would also come together to kick anyone's butt who wanted to mess with us. 

 

If you can find any of  Jean's art, consume it. I guarantee it will make you feel good, maybe better about things than you have for the past several years. It may also inject in to you, like it did with me, a love of Americana, and some insight into what makes us who we are. I think we could all use a dose of that faith and encouragement, and also a good laugh from the vivid characters. We were still all different, but the only thing that mattered was that we were Americans, and we had each other's back, no matter what. 

 

John

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On 4/18/2021 at 3:36 PM, Saikatana said:

On my highschool test. 
What was the first message Alexander Graham Bell sent by telephone? I didn't know so I guessed,"You car warranty is about to expire?"

:laugh:

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On 4/18/2021 at 3:36 PM, Saikatana said:

A little girl walks into a pet shop.
She walks up to the counter and says, "Excuse me, may I buy a wabbit, pwease?"
The shopkeeper thinks this is just the cutest thing ever. "Sure," he says sweetly. "Do you want a white wabbit or a bwown wabbit?"
The little girl says, "I don't think my pyfon gives a crap."

:laugh:

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On 4/23/2021 at 2:36 AM, Retcop said:

One of the first official written "research papers" i ever did in grade school was about the revolutionary invention of the transistor. The teacher praised it up and down, and put a note on it.  A while later, my Dad presented me with a two transistor handheld battery powered radio. What my parents did not know, was that I could pull in WOR in NYC, from our home in East Brunswick, NJ which was not far from Rutgers and Princeton. I remember going to Rutgers football games with my Dad, My sister was something of a violin prodigy. Some college violin virtuoso and teacher, agreed to take her on as a student. 

She became the youngest member ever of the New Jersey State Orchestra, as she was still in High School. 

 

Anyway, late night I listened to one of the best story tellers and comedians covering Americana I had ever hear in my life time, Jean Shepherd. 

He was a renaissance man, and even wrote for Car and Driver for a while, back when they were putting out an extraordinary magazine. I was up for hours 5 nights a week listening to Jean, and you could not help but feel that you knew him. Jean was a person who could relate the toughness, the resiliency, and the attitude of people who grew up on the streets NYC, (and all over the country) before it became the home of bun wearing girliemen,  men hating lesbians, and radicals who had no cause. 

 

If anyone wants to understand a big slice of Americana, and what Americans are really made of, find some tapes or articles or books written by Jean Shepherd. Our young guys will be enlightened, and our older members will instantly relate, no matter where you were from. Because back then, the only things that mattered was than you were a hardworking man whose word was his bond, and the only division was whether you were an American or not. It was back when all men seemed to have the same attitude as my Hoosier father,  and that was no fear when doing the right thing. 

 

I'm not saying times were 100% better times, (polio, pollution) but they sure were simpler times, when just being Americans brought us all together, because just like the neighborhood you lived it, being an American meant we would all come together to be the toughest SOB's who would protect the neighborhood against anyone, and as Americans we would also come together to kick anyone's butt who wanted to mess with us. 

 

If you can find any of  Jean's art, consume it. I guarantee it will make you feel good, maybe better about things than you have for the past several years. It may also inject in to you, like it did with me, a love of Americana, and some insight into what makes us who we are. I think we could all use a dose of that faith and encouragement, and also a good laugh from the vivid characters. We were still all different, but the only thing that mattered was that we were Americans, and we had each other's back, no matter what. 

 

John

I just listened to his story of the April fool's date. He's an excellent storyteller.  Turns out he was also an amateur radio operator as well. K2ors

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4 hours ago, tommag said:

I just listened to his story of the April fool's date. He's an excellent storyteller.  Turns out he was also an amateur radio operator as well. K2ors

 

That's outstanding !   

Did you find him on the web ?

John

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