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Master bath renovation


towtruck
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It has begun....the three room master bath/palace renovation begins today. I ordered a 32" wide cast iron bath tub and drain leg today. This project is going to be a chore. The room with the tub and toilet is only 60" wide at the studs. The tub is 60" wide and has to go into the room on end to get through the door. Corner to corner the tub measures around 63-64"....I will have to remove extra sheetrock to clear a thick set of wall studs in order to tip the new tub into position and let the apron pass into the wall on its way down flat. 

 

I will have to build a winch and crane over the new tub to lower it in place.....did I mention the tub weighs 351 pounds!!!!

 

Today the wife gets to clean out all her goodies so we can start removing wallpaper and trim to get ready to pull the old shower and tub out. We are going to do one room at a time and I am going to keep her toilet in place for as long as I can so all she has to use is my shower while I get the new tub installed. 

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Getting off to a slow start....I did strip the outer layer of wallpaper off and we will be tackling the glue next. I took some measurements and at least this bathroom is only half out of plumb. The shared wall with my bathroom is leaning in at the top 3/4" from top to bottom and is 1/4" per foot out of square with the back wall. The wall on the outside of the house is plumb and square to the back wall. This means I only have to straighten one wall.....too bad my freshly tiled shower is attached to that wall on the other side :surrender: I will have to trim stud faces and do some creative mud work on the sheetrock but should be able to correct most of the issues. I'm not too concerned with the out of square issue as long as the new tub drops in I can adjust the backer accordingly, I just need to get the wall plumb so the shower doors seal correctly. 

 

I don't believe I will be installing any tile in corner soap dishes and will opt for a long niche instead in the back wall. The wife has to decide what she wants and I gave her the parameters that we can use. 

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On 6/2/2022 at 11:46 AM, towtruck said:

Getting off to a slow start....I did strip the outer layer of wallpaper off and we will be tackling the glue next. I took some measurements and at least this bathroom is only half out of plumb. The shared wall with my bathroom is leaning in at the top 3/4" from top to bottom and is 1/4" per foot out of square with the back wall. The wall on the outside of the house is plumb and square to the back wall. This means I only have to straighten one wall.....too bad my freshly tiled shower is attached to that wall on the other side :surrender: I will have to trim stud faces and do some creative mud work on the sheetrock but should be able to correct most of the issues. I'm not too concerned with the out of square issue as long as the new tub drops in I can adjust the backer accordingly, I just need to get the wall plumb so the shower doors seal correctly. 

 

I don't believe I will be installing any tile in corner soap dishes and will opt for a long niche instead in the back wall. The wife has to decide what she wants and I gave her the parameters that we can use. 

 

TT : Where the tub sets , isn't there a end stub wall  ?. It's a framed wall opposite drain end of tub as wide as tub , so as to capture tub backing and act as a tile return .

 

IF You have that wall , REMOVE IT and then put the tub in ,when it's in and hooked up  replace the wall .   I sincerely hope you're not saying your bathroom is 60" wide  ,because if that's the case  YOU ARE IN FOR A ROUGH TIME . Tipping a tub or any other fixture within the parameter of it's own axis of exact wall dimensions  ; WON'T work !. NO matter the angle achieved the length remains constant and simply CAN'T be set into place ,as the tub remains 14"-20" in depth and WON'T slide down into a 60" capture .  I'm telling You this so YOU DON'T get the tub JACKED into the studs ,cast iron is a Muther humper to LIFT back out :tap:

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On 6/3/2022 at 6:04 PM, BushXM15 said:

 

TT : Where the tub sets , isn't there a end stub wall  ?. It's a framed wall opposite drain end of tub as wide as tub , so as to capture tub backing and act as a tile return .

 

IF You have that wall , REMOVE IT and then put the tub in ,when it's in and hooked up  replace the wall .   I sincerely hope you're not saying your bathroom is 60" wide  ,because if that's the case  YOU ARE IN FOR A ROUGH TIME . Tipping a tub or any other fixture within the parameter of it's own axis of exact wall dimensions  ; WON'T work !. NO matter the angle achieved the length remains constant and simply CAN'T be set into place ,as the tub remains 14"-20" in depth and WON'T slide down into a 60" capture .  I'm telling You this so YOU DON'T get the tub JACKED into the studs ,cast iron is a Muther humper to LIFT back out :tap:

Room is 60" wide.....the apron will have to go into the wall to drop it into place. Lucky for me the walls are 2x6 studs.  Once the tub arrives I will know which way it has to be tipped in. 

 

Here is the existing tub/shower....I finished removing wall paper today and that exposed all the water staining on the sheetrock.  All of that staining will get cut out as the new tub is wider.  

taXQufz.jpg?1

 

I may have to remove more sheetrock on the side I am tipping from in order not to have a stud in the way of that apron when it intrudes into wall.

 

The plan is to set padding and slick cardboard on floor and bring the tub in standing on the correct end. I will set tub on end on padding and cardboard. I will erect a hand crank winch over the tub to lower the tub in place. Once down I will lift the end up and remove padding and cardboard then push the tub against the back wall.  

 

My inside wall studs measure 60 - 60 1/4" and the tub measures 60". The apron will intrude into the wall less than 3". A 16" tall tub measures 63" on the diagonal. As long as the apron does not have a brace out on the end it will drop in place.  The left wall is not square either and lucky again it is wider than 90* so I will have minimal work to do getting the pocket ready to accept the new tub.

 

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On 6/4/2022 at 8:16 PM, towtruck said:

Room is 60" wide.....the apron will have to go into the wall to drop it into place. Lucky for me the walls are 2x6 studs.  Once the tub arrives I will know which way it has to be tipped in. 

 

Here is the existing tub/shower....I finished removing wall paper today and that exposed all the water staining on the sheetrock.  All of that staining will get cut out as the new tub is wider.  

taXQufz.jpg?1

 

I may have to remove more sheetrock on the side I am tipping from in order not to have a stud in the way of that apron when it intrudes into wall.

Good luck You're gonna need it .

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On 6/4/2022 at 6:14 PM, Derk_digler24 said:

This is going to suck. Please post pics haha

I will get photos of the suckness for sure!   The tub won't arrive for a few weeks.

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Here is the new tub. There is nothing in the way to hit the studs on the way into place other than that thin apron and it will go into the wall cavity between studs. The only other issue is getting the tub to lower flat while balanced on the opposite corner of the apron.  I may have to block the tub up, off the apron corner, to get it to lower evenly then pull the block out once in place.  I will figure all that out once the tub arrives.  

 

Right now the plan is to set two 4x4's on the floor lengthwise under the end of the tub that is down and tip the tub into place, move my winch over and pick up the end that is on the blocks and remove the blocks and set tub down on floor.

biHhUOg.jpg

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, towtruck said:

Room is 60" wide.....the apron will have to go into the wall to drop it into place. Lucky for me the walls are 2x6 studs.  Once the tub arrives I will know which way it has to be tipped in. 

 

Here is the existing tub/shower....I finished removing wall paper today and that exposed all the water staining on the sheetrock.  All of that staining will get cut out as the new tub is wider.  

taXQufz.jpg?1

 

I may have to remove more sheetrock on the side I am tipping from in order not to have a stud in the way of that apron when it intrudes into wall.

 

The plan is to set padding and slick cardboard on floor and bring the tub in standing on the correct end. I will set tub on end on padding and cardboard. I will erect a hand crank winch over the tub to lower the tub in place. Once down I will lift the end up and remove padding and cardboard then push the tub against the back wall.  

 

My inside wall studs measure 60 - 60 1/4" and the tub measures 60". The apron will intrude into the wall less than 3". A 16" tall tub measures 63" on the diagonal. As long as the apron does not have a brace out on the end it will drop in place.  The left wall is not square either and lucky again it is wider than 90* so I will have minimal work to do getting the pocket ready to accept the new tub.

 

 

I often wondered why all the TV renovation shows just stripped everything back to the studs.  ...then I did a bathroom renovation.   

 

I kept wanting to reduce demolition, which just cost me time. and ultimately more money.  I ended up going back to the studs, and even replaced the old half-inch subpar subfloor that was delaminating in places. I replaced it with Advantec  23/32 " inch subfloor.  Kind of pricy but worth it.   

 

Once I removed the old tile, I found an old layer of vinyl underneath (probably had asbestos in it).  Under that I found the crappiest most flexible delaminating plywood I've ever encountered.  I can't believe it was standard for the late '70s when the house was built.  I started trying to cut out and replace sections of it, and screwing the rest down, but ultimately just ended up taking it all out.   

 

The same for the drywall.  I started by trying to remove the layers of wallpaper (hate the stuff) but after I finally got the last layer off the drywall was in such crappy shape I ended up ripping it all too. 

 

I probably would have saved a week or two worth of time had I just gutted the place at the start.  

 

I suppose every house is different, and your mileage may vary, but after doing that DIY bathroom renovation, I just gutted the next one.  I really appreciate why the pros just gut old construction.   

 

 

Edited by Qweevox
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On 6/4/2022 at 8:24 PM, Qweevox said:

 

I often wondered why all the TV renovation shows just stripped everything back to the studs.  ...then I did a bathroom renovation.   

 

I kept wanting to reduce demolition, which just cost me time. and ultimately more money.  I ended up going back to the studs, and even replaced the old half-inch subpar subfloor that was delaminating in places. I replaced it with Advantec  23/32 " inch subfloor.  Kind of pricy but worth it.   

 

Once I removed the old tile, I found an old layer of vinyl underneath (probably had asbestos in it).  Under that I found the crappiest most flexible delaminating plywood I've ever encountered.  I can't believe it was standard for the late '70s when the house was built.  I started trying to cut out and replace sections of it, and screwing the rest down, but ultimately just ended up taking it all out.   

 

The same for the drywall.  I started by trying to remove the layers of wallpaper (hate the stuff) but after I finally got the last layer off the drywall was in such crappy shape I ended up ripping it all too. 

 

I probably would have saved a week or two worth of time had just gutted the place at the start.  

 

I suppose every house is different, and your mileage may vary, but after doing that DIY bathroom renovation, I just gutted the next one.  I really appreciate why the pros just gut old construction.   

 

 

My old house was built in 1912 and had layer upon layer of remodeling. I gutted that one to the studs in every room I redid. This house is in pretty good shape except for the walls not being square or plumb. The wallpaper came off okay, and yes I hate wallpaper with a passion. The underlayment will come out and the floor will get floated and tiled just like the other bath I did. Where the tub shower is now that will get all new sheetrock and the walls floated for tile around the new tub for the shower containment.  Starting fresh is so much easier if there are layers of bad remodeling or lots of rot. 

 

This house was built in 1985 with one or maybe one and a half baths and a laundry room. It was remodeled in 1991 to make it a two bath and the laundry was moved to the new garage. The entire bathroom area of the house is double walled (two 2x4 walls back to back) with a 2x6 wall dividing the two bathrooms. My hunch from cracking into it for the first bath is the walls are original and they stripped them and removed the laundry. They brought in the two tub/shower combos while the rooms were stripped and then built around the new tubs. The other bathroom is 65 1/2" wide and had a short wall added to make up the difference from the tub the the divider wall. I wish this bathroom had that wall as well to give me that extra room to set this new tub but it doesn't. If all else fails I will remove some siding, cut a couple studs and slide that tub in from the outside of the house!!!! I won't have to do that but the option is there if needed. Having board and batten siding makes it quick to gain access without tearing much up. 

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One of the interesting things I found was the old tile still had "Made in Japan" printed on the underside. That brought back memories from my childhood, when everything wasn't made in China, it was made in Japan.  

 

The house was initially built in '78, and due to the style I think it was remodeled very shortly after that.  I put Durock around the tub and shower surround, and then used Redgard to waterproof that.  I also used self-leveling concrete over the Advantec, which was probably overkill since the Advantec is heavy and flat,  and then used Redgard over that as well.   For the rest of the walls I used green board to replace the drywall.  Then tiled the floors and tub surround.   

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I remember a time when Made in  Taiwan was big. I have a tool set that my parents gave me that was made there and I still have 90% of the tools. They were pretty good quality for  back in the day.

 

Today I sanded and spot filled the walls and sanded again. I still have the section behind the toilet that has wallpaper on it and that will get done when the toilet comes out. I was able to get two coats of primer on the walls that are staying and they look really good. I have the cut lines drawn where I will cut out the tub/shower. I am cutting just a tad over 32" for the new tub to fit in. I may have to trim the sheetrock back further but I want to start with the minimum for now when I make that first cut. 

The wife showed me some tile colors she liked and one picture had three little spot lights over the tub....:hmm:......I went into the attic and I have the room to belly crawl under the AC unit to install those lights so her bath is going to get some additional lights that will be wired into the main light for the room. Her shower is dark right now as she uses a heavy curtain. Once the new shower doors go in the shower will be a lot lighter with the natural light from the garden window but the added spot lights should really set it off. Seems like an inexpensive upgrade to make. 

 

I'm pretty sure I will have to add some backers in the wall for the new tub / sheetrock transition so the rock has a firm backer to attach to.....all little details that will present once I gut the old one out. 

 

I have been looking at the garden window that the wife wants replaced and there is nothing wrong with it......all it needs is cleaned. One of these days I am going to clean it inside and out without her seeing me do it and make my case to leave it in place. The window is actually really nice and spending 800-1000 bucks on a new one plus the labor to put it in when it's unnecessary is foolish.......I think I can win her over on this one. 

 

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Posted (edited)
28 minutes ago, towtruck said:

I remember a time when Made in  Taiwan was big. I have a tool set that my parents gave me that was made there and I still have 90% of the tools. They were pretty good quality for  back in the day.

 

Today I sanded and spot filled the walls and sanded again. I still have the section behind the toilet that has wallpaper on it and that will get done when the toilet comes out. I was able to get two coats of primer on the walls that are staying and they look really good. I have the cut lines drawn where I will cut out the tub/shower. I am cutting just a tad over 32" for the new tub to fit in. I may have to trim the sheetrock back further but I want to start with the minimum for now when I make that first cut. 

The wife showed me some tile colors she liked and one picture had three little spot lights over the tub....:hmm:......I went into the attic and I have the room to belly crawl under the AC unit to install those lights so her bath is going to get some additional lights that will be wired into the main light for the room. Her shower is dark right now as she uses a heavy curtain. Once the new shower doors go in the shower will be a lot lighter with the natural light from the garden window but the added spot lights should really set it off. Seems like an inexpensive upgrade to make. 

 

I'm pretty sure I will have to add some backers in the wall for the new tub / sheetrock transition so the rock has a firm backer to attach to.....all little details that will present once I gut the old one out. 

 

I have been looking at the garden window that the wife wants replaced and there is nothing wrong with it......all it needs is cleaned. One of these days I am going to clean it inside and out without her seeing me do it and make my case to leave it in place. The window is actually really nice and spending 800-1000 bucks on a new one plus the labor to put it in when it's unnecessary is foolish.......I think I can win her over on this one. 

 

 

Yeah, I put in a new fixture over the sink, but took out the one ceiling light and replaced it with 5 separate 3" LED flush mounted adjustable spotlights.  That wasn't that hard for me, my attic could be a third floor so I had tons of room to work over the two 2nd floor bathrooms.  The lights really made a huge difference.  

 

I didn't have to replace the window, but honestly I would have liked to.  In one of the outbuilding are the house's old wooden windows.  They are in absolutely perfect shape, but a previous owner replaced them all with energy efficient double paned vinyl windows.  They're in good shape, but to me they don't look as good. But it'd be a huge job to reinstall the old wooden ones.  

 

As far as energy efficiency, we rarely turn on the heat in the winter, and occasionally we even turn on the AC.  Our problem is the Summer heat.   

Edited by Qweevox
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On 6/4/2022 at 9:24 PM, Qweevox said:

 

I often wondered why all the TV renovation shows just stripped everything back to the studs.  ...then I did a bathroom renovation.   

 

I kept wanting to reduce demolition, which just cost me time. and ultimately more money.  I ended up going back to the studs, and even replaced the old half-inch subpar subfloor that was delaminating in places. I replaced it with Advantec  23/32 " inch subfloor.  Kind of pricy but worth it.   

 

Once I removed the old tile, I found an old layer of vinyl underneath (probably had asbestos in it).  Under that I found the crappiest most flexible delaminating plywood I've ever encountered.  I can't believe it was standard for the late '70s when the house was built.  I started trying to cut out and replace sections of it, and screwing the rest down, but ultimately just ended up taking it all out.   

 

The same for the drywall.  I started by trying to remove the layers of wallpaper (hate the stuff) but after I finally got the last layer off the drywall was in such crappy shape I ended up ripping it all too. 

 

I probably would have saved a week or two worth of time had I just gutted the place at the start.  

 

I suppose every house is different, and your mileage may vary, but after doing that DIY bathroom renovation, I just gutted the next one.  I really appreciate why the pros just gut old construction.   

 

 

 

Exactly :

The same for the drywall.  I started by trying to remove the layers of wallpaper (hate the stuff) but after I finally got the last layer off the drywall was in such crappy shape I ended up ripping it all too. 

 

I probably would have saved a week or two worth of time had I just gutted the place at the start.  

 

I suppose every house is different, and your mileage may vary, but after doing that DIY bathroom renovation, I just gutted the next one.  I really appreciate why the pros just gut old construction.   

 

It's expensive enough buying fixtures and pile on a contractors helper or crew along with wages and % profit ,you simply CAN'T afford Not too !.

Drywall ,tape ,mud  and labor for hanging taping texturing is the least expense involved in 90% of all remodeling . 

I don't want to make grown Men cry  ,so I'm Not going to tell you what I used to pay for full semi loads of USG or Heartland Drywall direct from Plaster City CA. to the Job-site , even after brokered through the distribution material yards account . We bought full lifts of 5/8" Type X4x 12' and 14' even 16 Ft. on occasions . Good hangers can do lids aka ceilings , with 12 '  but 14' and 16' are WALLS only . That chit gets heavy  and will break center mass as it's impossible to support with two Men hanging . You can use board lifts but good hangers do it faster by hand .

 

I was STUNNED in the 70's when I went to Washington State and saw what had to be the very WORST drywall hanging and taping job I'd ever seen !.

The clowns who did it bought 4x 8'  and stood them up ,instead of running them horizontal as their meant to be hung . So every 4 ft. a tape joint ceiling to floor ,the wall resembled a snake slithering .  The edge of drywall is tapered ,so to be properly taped and skim fill coated with General purpose mud and finial coating should be done with Vinyl topping as it shrinks the least . I swear with a light looking down that wall EVERY NAIL SHOWED and the taper on edges WASN'T filled flat .  I think somebody used a 4 or 6" putty knife instead of an 8" or 12" wall board blade  .

 

The Steel King out of Los Angeles  ,put us up in that motel purposely  ,so we would know WHY we were hired to build his House  in the San Juan chain .  After two weeks we had perhaps #10-60 construction  people from as far away as  South Dakota ,watching the #4 of us building  Two houses in slightly less than #3 months ( We had GREAT weather for a majority of it ) . They weren't huge 3,700 Sq. Ft. and 4,200 and we did have a Crane because of the roof structures heavy beams . We did hired a Good plumber and painters  out of Seattle and one of our Good drywall guys had recently moved to Spokane ,so we got him and his apprentice .   The biggest obstacle we faced was that F ING Ferry   . You had to be on top of time schedule ferrying materials or you were SCREWED !. 

 

 

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