Jump to content
pdog1517

Reloading .223/5.56

Recommended Posts

A simple step by step of reloading our beloved cartridge, the .223 Remington or 5.56 NATO. This a very simple how to, everyone has their own methods, tricks, tools, and process. The very first step is SAFETY, reloading is rewarding but can be dangerous if care is not taken. When beginning new loads ALWAYS start low and work your way up.

 

The tools

IMAG0038-1.jpg

IMAG0042-1.jpg

IMAG0047-1.jpg

IMAG0046-2.jpg

IMAG0045-1.jpg

IMAG0040-1.jpg

IMAG0041-1.jpg

IMAG0052.jpg

Components

IMAG0043-1.jpg

 

 

1st Step: Tumble

There are 2 types of media, corn cob for fine polishing and walnut for more agressive rough cleaning. I prefer to use 2/3 treated corncob with 1/3 walnut, this seems to give me faster tumble times and clean brass in one step. Tumbling times will increase as your media ages and becomes contaminated.

IMAG0053.jpg

IMAG0010-1.jpg

IMAG0011-1.jpg

Edited by pdog1517

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Step 2-Lube

Throw em in a loading block and spray em

IMAG0012-1.jpg

Step 3- Size/Deprime

Follow the manufacturers instructions on die setup

IMAG0033-1.jpg

IMAG0049.jpg

 

Step 4- Trim, Chamfer, and Debur

IMAG0015-1.jpg

IMAG0050.jpg

IMAG0051.jpg

 

Step 5- Case Prep

This involves as little or as much as you wish to do. It can include deburring flash holes, uniforming pockets, uniforming flash holes, cleaning primer pockets, and swaging for mil spec brass. Swaging is a required step for brass with crimped primers.

Swaging with an RCBS Swage die

IMAG0048.jpg

IMAG0031-1.jpg

Cleaning the primer pocket with a home made tool

IMAG0026-1.jpg

 

 

 

Step 6- Prime

I prefer the off press method using a Lee Auto Prime

IMAG0044-1.jpg

IMAG0020.jpg

IMAG0021-1.jpg

Edited by pdog1517

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Step 7- Charge

This one requires extreme care, refer to your loading manual for specs. Start low and work your way up. Safety is paramount.

IMAG0016-1.jpg

IMAG0019.jpg

IMAG0025-1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Step 8- Seating the bullet

COL is another step that requires extreme care. Refer to your manual for COL based on bullet weight and style. Seating the bullets to deep into cases or long/ jammed into the rifling can cause high, unsafe pressure levels. Crimping can be acomplished at this point, some dies have the crimp built in while others use a seperate die to achieve the desired crimp.

IMAG0034-1.jpg

IMAG0035-1.jpg

Check your COL with calipers, and adjust the die as needed.

IMAG0036-1.jpg

 

The Finished product

IMAG0037-1.jpg

 

Box em or bag em. Label all containers with bullet style and weight, powder and charge weight, primer, case, COL, load date, and any other info that pertains to each specific load.

 

Remember to be safe. Wear eye protection during all reloading work. Start new loads low and work em up.

Most importantly, have fun and enjoy the results. :flea:

Edited by pdog1517
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great post. Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome job man. I appreciate the time and effort you put into this thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone feel like the thread needs anything added or changed? Any steps anyone needs more detail on? I don't do a lot in the case prep dept. other than trim, chamfer, debur, and clean pockets. I know that some guys like to get em perfect for consistancy. There's also sizing cases to your specific chamber, and loading bullets to -.010" off the lands or closer for accuracy gains. Let me know if anything seems too vague. I feel like I finally added something worthwhile to the Armory and its' members.

Edited by pdog1517

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks pdog...I just made a decision to reload and the information here is great. Now if I could find cases, primers and bullets I would be happy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That was great. I just finished getting all my supplies and have been reading several manuals. One question do you crimp your or just seat them? I was just wondering if I need a crimp die. :flea:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That was great. I just finished getting all my supplies and have been reading several manuals. One question do you crimp your or just seat them? I was just wondering if I need a crimp die. :flea:

 

 

I have the same dies set as you have for the .223 (RCBS FL Die Set .223 Part# 11101)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have the same dies set as you have for the .223 (RCBS FL Die Set .223 Part# 11101)

 

By the literature, those dies have a roll crimp built into the bullet seater. Whether you crimp or not is controlled by how far down you set the die in your press.

 

Most competition seaters do not have a crimp built into the die so you can opt for a second operation to crimp on canelure bullets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am waiting on my dies to get here to start reloading .223. So I have a Q,, What is swaging and why is it needed?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...