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pdog1517

Reloading .223/5.56

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Many, many thanks for this post. I really appreciate seeing the process distilled to these basic steps.

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Nice post pdog! I always appreciate visuals over verbiage any day :thumb:

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I use about 4gallons of water and put 4 boxes of sure jell in it ,decap my brass .Put the brass in a net bag and than in a 5 gal.bucket pure the water and sure jell mix over he brass let sit about 15 min. Shake around alitte and wash off the bass with water and dry it,and it only takes about 2 hour of tumbling to be clean.

G

 

 

I've never heard of "sure jell." What is it and where do you get it?

Thanks

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To all,

I have been reloading with a single stage RCBS press for many years now and just got my RCBS Turret press in last night. I strongly recommend it even for the novice reloader as it is as close to a progressive reloading system as you can get and about only 1/3rd the cost, especially if you already have any RCBS equipment.

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"Swaging" is to remove the crimp from the primer pocket on Military brass. The RCBS set-up is one of the best and easiest I've used. It's a good investment for the $15, sooner or later you'll need it.

 

Never reloaded but am interested. How many $ would you say it takes to get started using the equipment shown in the pictures. Don't need an exact figure.

Edited by stsrex

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you can pick up perfectly good old equipment on ebay very cheap.

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Just have one question, is this about correct:

 

Hodgdon H335 ---> 26.7 charge

CCi primer

Hornady ?

 

What was the bullet weight on your 223 pet load, and is that the correct charge, I'd like to turn some out.

 

Thanks great job on the tutorial.

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please tell me you can help. i've posted this in a new thread but havent gotten any answers and really dont want to blow my head off

 

 

 

 

 

so i put my new ar togatether and took it to the range and collected the casings after ordering reloading supplies . sent the brass to a buddy to tumble for me and first thing he noticed was that my ar gouged the hell out of the brass right by the neck and back further on the casing, kind of little dents. usually about 4 per case. wasnt sure if this will be a problem or not also he said the casings i fired first were more damaged than the later ones. so i figured here would be the best place to ask some questions

 

is this normal for an ar? or is it only normal for a new ar?

 

is it going to cause any problems reloading?

 

is there any special technique to getting around this?

 

since later rounds that day weent damaged as badly as the first box is there a chance that its just breaking in and it will stop happening soon?

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My ar puts small dents on the necks and the deflector puts small dents halfway down almost every casing. I reload them all and have never had a problem.

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thanks so much for the answer lol i thought i was gonna have to just try it and pray lol.

 

do you notice you need to replace the brass more often than other guns you reload for?

 

thanks once again.

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BTW firing the brass will remove most of those dents, even if they simply get redented in the process.

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do you notice you need to replace the brass more often than other guns you reload for?

 

In my experience it doesn't make enough of a difference to notice. If you get dents on the case necks that will cause them to split eventually but most of the dents i get are halfway down the case.

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I've never heard of "sure jell." What is it and where do you get it?

Thanks

Sure Jell is a powder used in canning jams and jellies, it can be found in most grocery stores in the aisle with canning jars and canning supplies

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Very helpful

Thank You Sir !!

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Great post....much appreicated. I see you use a Speer manual. We have a 1984 manual (i think)

and have decided to get a new one to compare. Just wondering what manual is the most user friendly with mass info and calibers and no bias info due to manufactures wanting to sell their products....Speer? or another?

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